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  1. #1
    seńor brushman! brushman's Avatar
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    Princples of War tactics applied to Warhammer 40k

    I decided to write up a tactica of my own. It's a work in progress, and I'll add a new section via post in this thread every week or so tell it's finished. Feedback is much appreciated.

    It's similar in some respects to Hilly's Principles of War tactica, but I took a little differnet approach. I can't compare to the quality of Hilly's, and everyone else's excellent articels and tacticas, but I'll go ahead and shair anyway. Again, feedback is much appreciated. If I get pausitive feedback I'll send it in as an article. I'd appreciate comments, even if you're just saying that it sucks. Anyway, here we go.

    PRINCIPLES OF WAR APPLIED TO WARHAMMER 40K

    BTW (by the way) sorry if any of the figure links don't work. (please notify me of unworking links)

    Introduction-

    Hopefully that this information will give you some points to think about and consider when in game. Warhammer 40k of course isn’t as complicated as real world warfare, but it catches onto some of the principles although it may not be as intricate.

    Marshal Foch, France's famous military commander, said, "The art of war, like other arts, has its fundamental principles. If that were not the case, war would not be an art. War is learnable and is something that must be learned; it is an understanding of the true nature of war gained through extensive and intensive study of military history that is the basis for study of the art of war." Regarding Principles of War, he stated, "There is a gap between knowing and having ability, but with absolutely no knowledge, it is not possible to move in a single jump to having ability. In contrast, if one has the knowledge, one can have the ability. Knowledge is a necessary condition. If one has knowledge, in a short time one would gain confidence, and confidence brings accurate decisions." Knowing these principles and your enemy can influence your decisions in a better way. Like the saying, knowledge is power.

    Characteristics of Warfare-

    Warfare is waging of war against an enemy; armed conflict. Similar to Warhammer 40k, a game simulates a battle between two enemies, or like the definition said, armed conflict. It is paramount to understand what the objective is, as well as your opponent, and understanding their army and philosophies of battle.

    The essential goal in land warfare is to control the area. In Warhammer 40k, this translates to controlling the table, objectives, and terrain.

    In land warfare there are certain things you need to notice about your opposing enemy and the table for example, zone of operations, opposing (enemy) forces, weapon systems, etc., As applied to Warhammer 40k, zone operations would be where you can maneuver. Obviously you’re limited to the table. Notice your opposing force. What will he try to do? What units in his army will serve what purposes? What’s his goals or objective(s) in the battle? You also have to consider opposing weapons, and what weapons you have capability of in your army. For example, in Warhammer 40k, your opponent will most likely have special weapons with unique, or devastating abilities. Examples that pop into my head include things like Tau Marklights in conjunction with missiles they can direct, or the abilities they can have on their allies, like enhancing their BS. Other examples would be weapons which need no line of sight, or that ignore cover, like flamers. There’s a wide variety of different weapons in real warfare as well as Warhammer 40k, so tha’ts for you to investigate in. Before you face an opponent I highly suggest you look down their list, and look at their army and weapons to see what he’s capable off.

    Objectives are another trait of real warfare that can be applied in Warhammer 40k. You will always have an objective in Warhammer 40k. Sometimes it’s as simple as destroying your opponent, other times you must hold a piece of terrain, or get to your enemies deployment zone. Whatever the objective may be, for victory it needs to be your number one priority. After all, whoever wins the objective wins the game. Lets take a simple example, of playing where you must get to your opponents board edge. If you focus on just destroying your opponent’s army and not getting to their board edge at all, it is very unlikely that you win. Even though you may destroy more of your enemy’s army, he will still win. It also affects the build of your list. If you have all slow units, and nothing exceptionally fast you will have a very hard time completing the mission.

    And last but not least of the 3 main characteristics of land warfare, you have the terrain. In modern warfare this isn’t so much a factor as it used to be, due to the high technological advancements and weaponry, as well as satellites and the such. It’s still a factor, though, and can work as cover. During the World Wars trenches running miles were built for cover. In Warhammer 40k, boards generally have anything varying from very little terrain, like a dessert board, or a lot of terrain, like a city fight. In Warhammer 40k you have to observe many different things, such as paths of movement, deployment, firing lanes, etc.

    You also want to think about where you opponent is planning on moving, and what are the different possibilities of the pathways he takes. If he has a fast army that will go for close combat, he will most likely speed forward using cover as much as possible. You have to have a plan to counter these movements.

    Deployment is quite a broad topic in Warhammer 40k, and many of it is army specific, but there’s some basic ideas that you’ll want to think about. It’s also a very neglected tactic, that can win or lose you the game. First off, you'll almost always want your opponent setting up first. This way you can set up accordingly to your opponent. Usually heavy support is set-up first. If he puts down a vehicle, then you put down one of your units to counter it.

    For example, lets say he sets down a Predator on the left flank. You could place your tank hunting heavy weapons squad in position to destroy his Predator unless he moves. Forcing your opponent to move on his/her first turn is usually a good idea. You want to control the battle, forcing him to move to how you deploy. You don't want him controlling how you move. Controlling the battle will lead you to victory. And when he moves his predator, that's less weapons he can shoot with it.

    This basic principle goes throughout all of setting up. You set-up your units to counter his units.

    Also try to think what his strategy is. If you place, lets say a Land Raider on the left side of the field, and he in turn places a heavy weapons team on that same side, then chances are, they are their to destroy that Land Raider of yours. Acknowledge this, and prepare a counter attack, or give him something else to work with.

    Infiltrators also come into play, whether it be you or your opponent infiltrating. Lets say your opponent is infiltrating his whole army. Look at his army list, and see what he has. Lots of close combat? Then expect him to infiltrate close to your army and attempt to assault. Again, you'll have to acknowledge this as you're setting up, and adjust to it. An example would be having some counter charge units that can access all parts of the board. Lets say that your opponent has lots of shooting infiltrators. This means that you'll need to use cover as much as possible.

    You could be the one infiltrating. With your shooty squads, infiltrate them into a nice firing position in which they can target enemy squads of which is their purpose of destroying. In other words, infiltrate your units into cover, and where they have LOS of enemy squads that they excel at killing. Also consider firing lanes. Before the game, check all the firing lanes. Ones that you and your opponent will try to capture. Possessing firing lanes throughout the battlefield can make it troublesome for your opponent to maneuver safely.

    Here are some general rules to keep in mind. (1) Many times, a more aggressive player, tactically, will win the game rather then someone who is more defensive. Especially when there is a mission such as getting into your enemies deployment zone. (2) If you’re placing a unit for it to just be there; IE being their to just take up space or has no purpose, then I urge you to go back and find out why it’s in your list in the first place? Is it even worth it? Often times they wouldn’t of needed to be in your list in the first place. (3) Having plans set-in stone, for example saying, “This anti-tank havoc squad will go on the right flank, and this bike squad that will target troops on the left”, is a bad idea. In conjunction with the quote above, you would place that anti-tank havoc squad near his tanks – not just on the right flank. (if i remember correctly, I found these 3 points in one of Cheredines posts, and found it very valuable information.

    Weather is mentioned in real warfare, but really has no play in Warhammer 40k. There are however some things, for example, in a house rule match or something similar there might be an iced over area, or something to that effect. Rules wise, it could count as difficult terrain. This is to be taken account for when you’re playing in a Warhammer 40k battle.
    Characteristics of employment of land units-

    A. A regions absorption of combat power: Basically spreading out your forces will make you weaker.
    B. Increase in combat capability from the terrain: The value of terrain itself and of fortifications creates the possibility of defense or creates value as an attack objective. In Warhammer 40k you’ll want to take advantage of terrain, using it as cover and increases the tactical flexibility of your units and movements.
    C. Enduring Quality of Combat Power: Basically, it’s when you’re in the midst of battle, and/or in a state of panic, you don’t collapse suddenly and easily. The first thought that came to mind when analyzing this tactic for war hammer 40k, is the old saying “Don’t put all your eggs in one basket”, meaning you don’t want to dedicate too much of your army in elites that can get killed quickly, even if they’re very powerful. The classic example of this would be a precious command squad mounted in a land raider. This is putting lots of points into a unit that can be destroyed with a single enemy shot. Try to avoid this if at all possible, at least in smaller games.
    D. Variety of mobile equipment and necessity for mass: Basically it says you need lots of mobility and equipment that suits the units purposes. Directly relates to warhammer 40k IMHO.

    It is important you know these to an extent to fully understand the principles of warfare. (Note: I left out some due to them not relating to Warhammer 40k).

    Logistics-

    This is the managment of recourses in the military and in battle, and getting them to the places they are needed. You must provide recourses for your army as well as disrupt the enemy for full effect. Logistics include the control of food, ammo, fuel, etc. This doesn't directly apply to warhammer 40k, but it is something to think about.

    Last edited by brushman; November 12th, 2006 at 17:50.

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  3. #2
    seńor brushman! brushman's Avatar
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    Meaning and Basic Principles of Combat-

    The main factors governing combat are Time, Space, and Energy (power).

    ENERGY [POWER]--basic factor in striking the enemy
    TIME--the natural phenomena of light and darkness, heat and cold, fair and rainy weather, etc., and timeliness
    SPACE--character of the terrain and other natural phenomena, the spatial extent, and posture

    Pretty self-explanatory. Energy, or power, would be the brute force of your army against your opponents. Time doesn’t have much to do with Warhammer 40k, but there are missions like Night Fight which have to do with 40k somewhat, like making your army flexible for whatever conditions you have to play in, whether it be night fight, or not. And then, space, which has to do with the terrain, which has been talked about earlier.

    *Combat Power:
    War is a struggle between two parties that have free will; and this struggle is an act of violence employed to cause the opponent to submit, and to realize our will. In other words, among the three factors of combat, energy is the direct instrument for combat, and this fighting energy--energy to fight the enemy in military combat--is combat power. Also, with changes in the times, the importance of combat power is gradually increasing, and the proportional difference in importance between it and the factors of time and space is becoming greater and greater.

    Organizing and Creating Combat Power-

    With only exceptional organization and coordination it is possible to apply combat power to its fullest effect. Command, and keeping organized combat power, advancing combat power, and sustaining combat power is all extremely important. Having command is an absolute prerequisite. Without it, your army will crumple, and fall apart. Similar to Warhammer 40k, you have to have organization within your army. You can’t just throw in random units into your army and expect them to just work together consummately. You can’t just move units in random directions, or put no thought into what you shoot, or assault. "Numerous changes on the battlefield are bound to occur. When there is disunity of plans and inconsistency in concept, with development of the tactical situation, organization immediately becomes disoriented, and coordination collapses. Thus, unity of command and of plan or concept is extremely important for integrating combat power and for the attainment of common objectives." While this doesn’t directly effect the game of Warhammer 40k, it just means that you, the commander, have to be ready for many changes which will occur on the battlefield no matter what the circumstances.
    You must be careful, however. Many enemies can be tricky, and organization based on incorrect information, or incorrect factors can result in unwanted deterioration of your force, and eventuates in no combat power. In 40k, your enemy, if skilled at least, will often field many tricks and plans or tactics. You must think of these different things, and plan for a counter if they do occur.

    Examples of good organization would be the Normandy landing. Bad organization examples include counter attacks at Gallipoli, Guadacanal, and Saipan.

    Originality and Surprise-

    Try to be original. Do a maneuver that you haven’t tried on your opponent before. Surprise is a hard thing to capture, but once perfected can be a very powerful factor, and give you the initiative. Try to read your opponent. See what his actions are, and where he’s going with them. If you successfully do this, you can provide a sufficient counter attack. To prevent surprise, you need to know your opponents army. Know his moves, and how he plays. If you know this, it will be very hard for him to achieve surprise. This same thing goes for you. If you play someone unfamiliar with your play style or army, or are inexperienced, it will be much easier to create surprise. It can also be achieved via how your models look. For example, an opponent will try to target a very well painted enemy model. It may not even be worth much on the battlefield, but how you play that particular model can make your opponent do stupid mistakes because he’s so focused on destroying it, and countering it.

    Like said earlier, there are innumerable changes on the battlefield that must be acknowledged. When you coordinate a plan, you must be careful and be able to adjust accordingly to what has happened in the battle. A plan is never fully finished as long as the battle is still commencing. In 40k, this is basically just building on have plans of action for your army, but they are never set in stone, and are always adjustable pertinent to the battle at hand.

    Don’t present openings in which the enemy can take advantage of-

    This basically means position your units and play so that they can’t take advantage of anything. To make this more understandable, an example would be the U.S. Navy’s circular formation, Germany's Panzerfaust (moving fortress) in World War II, circular defense forces like the U.S. and Chinese used at Hukawng Valley at the northern border of Burma, etc.


    Having the advantage in combat power is important. You must make use of terrain, weather, taking favorable positions, obtaining applicable information, etc. But to be successful, you must utilize tactical opportunity and surprise attack, being some of the most important tactics. This also applies to warhammer 40k, as if you surprise your enemy you will often come out successful, take opportunities you have over the enemy.

    Tactical opportunity is something that must be taken advantage of as soon as possible, as most times it will only be available for a short period of time, although there are occasions where it will last particularly long. To create tactical opportunity you must do it yourself. There are different ways of going about this, such as luring the enemy into terrain where one's own combat power can be used but application of enemy combat power is difficult, trapping, or splitting enemies, and acting so that our posture is favorable to us.

    This basically means that you must play so that your enemy exposes or causes weak points in his strategy, plan, tactics, or army.

    Tactical opportunity can also appear in the midst of a battle by chance. Not necessarily caused by yourself, but maybe some mistakes, or something that your opponent doesn’t see. Examples of this type of tactical opportunity would be your opponent separating his forces, or him being confused on what to do. Things that your opponent might create himself (/herself). Or maybe it’s just how the table is set up – it might give your force an advantage. Or, maybe the weather. In Warhammer 40k terms, a prime example would be Night Fight. Night Fight missions generally give advantages to more close assault oriented armies rather then shooting armies. The change of offensive combat power could be another tactical opportunity. He might have been advancing, but he could be stopped, or weakened, and instead you take the initiative and combat power.

    If you see tactical opportunity in a warhammer 40k game, or just in any modern warfare, you can’t just go about carelessly to achieve successfulness. You must put thought into this opportunity. You don’t want to blow it!
    Last edited by brushman; November 10th, 2006 at 06:35.

  4. #3
    seńor brushman! brushman's Avatar
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    Tactic of Mass-

    By definition, the tactic of mass is the concentration of an overwhelmingly large quantity of military manpower and materiel and the formation of combat power with absolute superiority in quantity over that of the enemy.

    During World War II, the Germans were crushed by this tactic employed by the Soviet Union. An example using Warhammer 40k would be a massive hoard style Tyranid or Ork army overwhelming and defeating a army of lesser models, like Necrons.

    Surprise Attack-

    A surprise attack is an attack on the enemy without warning. It is the attempt to gain superiority in a battle by catching the enemy unaware and off guard leaving them little to no time to react. Most often speed and power are necessary for this kind’ve attack. There are different types of surprise attack:

    (1) Time-type surprise attack
    (2) Place-type surprise attack
    (3) Mass-type surprise attack
    (4) Quality-type surprise attack
    (5) Tactics-type surprise attack
    (6) Technological-type surprise attack

    They pretty much speak for themselves. Briefly going through each one, time would be surprise by catching the enemy off guard because of the time you attack. In Warhammer 40k, this can be achieved by taking a very fast unit and attacking him sooner then he/she expected. He didn’t expect to be attacked so soon. A more specific example would be a chaos lord with d. speed, and infiltrate. With correct placement, a first turn charge is quite possible. Place would be where you attack the enemy. A warhammer example would be placing most of your army on the left flank. Then, you speed over to the opposite flank leaving most of your opponent’s army stuck on the left side. Of course this only works if you have a very quick army and you are capable of more mobility then your opponent. The re-positioning of your army through special rules like the Necron Deceiver can also achieve place-type surprise attack. Same goes for teleportation, and the such. Mass would be overwhelming your enemy. They might not of been ready to defend a massive number wise, attack. Quality would be the power of your units, and tactics would be how your maneuver them, or incorporating such tactics as the Fish of Fury (with correct positioning you can disembark your devilfish and rapid fire the enemy, and they won’t be able to assault you within their next turn). Technological type surprise attack would of course be the use of highly advanced weaponry that your opponent wasn’t ready for, or wasn’t aware the capability of.

    Frontal Combat Power-

    This is basically the attack on your enemy’s front. When you decide to attack your enemy in this manner, you must consider certain things in your attack: the objective, power exceeding the enemy’s, flank-support relationship, enemy situation, and the terrain as well as the mission.

    Containment and Strike-

    Containment and Strike compliment each other – you must contain your enemies combat power to a desired time and place, so thereafter or simultaneously you can strike your opponent with your own combat power hindering your enemy. When you contain your enemy, it limits his freedom of action.

    Containment actions include hindering your opponent’s movement/maneuverability, organization, speed/quickness, or forcing change of direction of your opponents combat power.

    Examples of applying and using the containment and strike:

    Envelope and Turning movement:
    -Containment on the enemy’s front
    -Moving to a favorable position, like a flank, or rear, and attacking
    Figure 1: http://myspace-404.vo.llnwd.net/0139...90081404_l.gif

    Defense:
    -Containment of enemy lines, and (possibly) a steady interdiction of the enemy force
    -Counterattack, which serves as the strike against the enemy
    Figure 2: http://myspace-032.vo.llnwd.net/0139...90092032_l.gif

    Pursuit:
    -Force 1, the containment, continually exerts pressure upon the enemy forcing them to withdraw
    -Force 2, the strike, attacks from a different direction, mainly a flank, encircling and destroying the enemy.
    See figure 2 for a general diagram.

    Concentration of Combat Power-

    Force Concentration is basically the concentration with your military power on a specific target enemy unit, or force, to cause disproportionate losses for the enemy. Lets say you have 2 tanks that target the enemy. They do however much damages those tanks would do. Then, lets say you have 4 tanks. Having twice as many tanks will quadruple the firepower the unit provides. Therefore, concentration upon a single enemy unit rather then targeting their army as a whole, will work better. This is one of the methods of war – it applies limited power most effectively. By using this tactic, even if your army is inferior to that of your opponents, you can still overcome. This makes it one of the most important principles of war. This all applies to Warhammer 40k. Superiority beats inferiority.

    However, you can’t go about doing this tactic with no thought or in a precarious manner. Whilst using this tactic there are certain things you must keep in mind including establishment of the objective, and a consistent plan; positive initiative, selection of critical time and place, integrated application of combat power, economic use of combat power, and finally application of tactical mobility. Most of these are quite self-explanatory, but in any case I’ll go over each one briefly.

    First, you must establish the objective and have a plan. Pretty basic. Without these effective concentration of combat power won’t be present.

    You must have a positive initiative. By being the attacker, you have greater initiative. Having better initiative makes it easier to fulfill concentration of combat power. When your on the defensive, your force is much easier to get dispersed.

    You must choose the right time and place. When assaulting the wrong area you can become overpowered, or maybe if you don’t attack at the right time you won’t have the fullest effect you could’ve had. A smart opponent can take advantage of this, and your opponent will end up the victor rather then yourself.

    You must integrate and apply your combat power appropriately. This means you can’t consolidate your army for a attack, even if you have concentrated it onto an enemy unit. You must have organization, including ground, sea, and air attack coordination; main and secondary attacks (this can also be containment and strike), fire power and mobility, depth, operations, intelligence, etc. I’m sure you’ve noticed that many of these don’t fit in with Warhammer 40k, but some do, like coordination of all your different types of units.

    With regards to economic use of combat power, Sun-tzu stated, “knowing use of the disparity in numbers is victory,� You must position your troops efficiently so there are not wasted or idle.

    Most if not all of these relate to Warhammer 40k. You can pretty much take the above statements and directly apply them to Warhammer 40k, for the most part.

    Application of Tactical Mobility-

    I want to again note the importance of tactical mobility, which is essential to many tactics within’ modern warfare and warhammer 40k, including Concentration and Combat Power, Containment and Strike, Frontal Combat Power, etc.

    Methods of Concentrating Combat Power-

    There’s two main ways to go about doing this. First off, concentrating your force before you reach enemy lines, and secondly, concentrating your force on the battlefield. Either way you go, try to make the use of terrain to conceal your concentrated force. See figures 3 and 4 for diagrams.
    Figures 3:
    http://myspace-152.vo.llnwd.net/0139...90099152_l.gif
    Figure 4:
    http://myspace-718.vo.llnwd.net/0139...90103718_l.gif


    Principle of centripetalism-


    Centripetalism is the movement from the circumference of a circle to the center. In war, this would be force that has surrounded the enemy moving in for an attack. By surrounding the enemy they have nowhere to run, or hide. They are cut off from the rest of their army, and by moving your forces in; it concentrates your forces increasing the power output of your army. See figure 5 for the diagram.

    Figure 5: http://myspace-964.vo.llnwd.net/0139...90107964_l.gif

    Advancing from different directions and linking up to attack-

    It’s basically as it says it is, pretty simple. But, in other words, it’s the contrivance of invading the enemy in several different positions, enveloping, and destroying their force. There are an abundance of ways to go about doing this particular maneuver, depending on the direction, time, place, and intervals of the separated advances.

    Direction: This varies from attacking the enemy on opposite flanks, all around, three opposing directions, etc. See figure 6 for the diagram.

    Figure 6: http://myspace-485.vo.llnwd.net/0139...90120485_l.gif

    Disposed posture before the separated advances: There are two main ways of going about this. There is from the initial united posture, and from an initially dispersed posture. See fig 7.

    Figure 7: http://myspace-674.vo.llnwd.net/0139...90115674_l.gif

    Echelons: similar formation of groups, units, or individuals. See fig 8.

    Figure 8: http://myspace-006.vo.llnwd.net/0139...90126006_l.gif

    Equal distance and time between your forces and the enemies: You want to have your forces all be the same distance away from the enemy so you strike together, and link up at the correct places.

    When you link up and destroy the enemy, it’s not just the concentration of combat power that yields thy successful, but also the envelope and pincer movements, which are involved in most of the attacks.

    When you operate these maneuvers, you’ll want to keep in mind things such as ensuring superiority in combat against expected enemy resistance during separated advance, topography of the area, and knowing the terrain; and lastly appropriate allocation of combat power after the link-up is made, considering enemy counter attacks, terrain, objectives, goals, etc. You must also keep in mind extra pathways in terrain where appropriate support has the option of coming in through, using your speed to your advantage not giving your opponent time to react, and keeping secret trying to keep as much surprise as you can.

  5. #4
    seńor brushman! brushman's Avatar
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    Another addition, this time focussing on Envelopment. (this one's a lot shorter then the ones above)

    Envelopment-

    Envelopment makes the use of attacking the rear and flanks of the enemy, where they are weakest. Instead of attacking the brunt of the enemies frontal force, you sweep through the sides, collapsing their organization and combat power. This tactic, in simple terms, is attacking the enemy in a weak point (most likely a flank or rear) while containing the enemy to his position.

    Implementing this tactic can cause several results, in your favor, including cutting off enemy communications (although this one doesn’t exactly apply to warhammer 40k), splitting the enemy forces, lowering morale, etc.

    However, you must be careful. There are ways to counter the envelopment. I’ll give a few examples. First off, retrograde movement. This is quite simple. Basically, it’s moving back, so the you can no longer hit the enemy’s weak point, whether it be a flank, or rear side of the army. Lets take a simple diagram. The V is the enemy force moving into strike, where the ----- is your force. Simply moving your force back will prevent the enemy, V, from attacking a weak point.

    ________V
    -------

    Another counter which can be used, is extending or refusing a wing, or strike from the enemy at a certain point in your lines, most likely the flank. If you position in your lines, and your enemy attacks a flank you can reposition and maneuver to block that area, or attack by from the enemy. ________ will be your forces, and V, the enemy strike. The ) is the position in which your units take to defend the attack.
    V
    \
    \
    .... __________
    .... (

    Originally, your force was just in a straight line, but then they repositioned like a hook, to defend that flank from the incoming enemy. This movement can also be done with using reinforcements; instead of repositioning you’re already in battle units.

    You’re going to have to consider these different tactics, which can deny your envelopment, when you decide to use it yourself. Keep in mind being able to hold and destroy your enemy, and also not letting them counter your envelopment.

    Like many situations, secrecy and surprise is extremely important in not letting your opponent act on your envelopment via counter measures and attacks. Deployment fakes/dummy set-ups, feints, etc. are ways of keeping the element of surprise.

    Other things to keep in mind include Superiority in relative tactical mobility, containing the enemy on his current front, maintenance and achieving superior combat power, concerted actions of all units, and appropriate basic disposition.

    There’s also 3-dimensional envelopment, which includes air forces, but this doesn’t really apply to warhammer 40k.

    A real war example of Envelopment would be the encirclement at Sinzweya in Burma, where Japanese forces totally surrounded the British. If it weren’t for the British’s aerial supply, they wouldn’t have survived.
    Last edited by brushman; November 10th, 2006 at 06:42.

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    seńor brushman! brushman's Avatar
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    Breakthrough-

    The Breakthrough is the act of certain movement within a battle that separates and divides enemy forces, and combat power. You’ll need a strong penetration of the enemy force in certain area.

    An example of the Breakthrough in real war, are the Germans breaking through the Maginot Line at the beginning of World War II. The Germans, in conjunction with Breakthrough used blitz attacks. This was basically throwing everything you have at them at once – air and land attacks, artillery, infantry attacks, etc.

    Make sure that you are not overpowered before you attack, and then split the enemy within their lines. After you breakthrough the enemy, you must breakthrough the final element of the enemy – which would be the objective.

    When applying this tactic, you must have overwhelming power, maintaining breakthrough until final objective or goal is achieved, and the application of power being swift; in other words, fast, and to the point with the most mobility possible, and correct manueverments.

    Countermeasures can be taken to the maneuver, which you need to know as well, because it can be used against you and you need to be prepared for these counter actions. These counter attacks include drawing combat power away from your breakthrough front, enveloping your breakthrough attack, retreating, or repositioning to a new position in which the breakthrough attack can be better dealt with.

    When selecting the area where you plan to make your breakthrough attack, you must consider weak points in the enemy, enemy army division and organization, terrain, etc. When directing your attack make it as straightforward as possible, for the best advantage. Slanting, and attacking at an angle will many times weaken your force and leave flanks open to be taken advantage of by the enemy.
    You must also be aware to enemy front line positions. If they are in a concave position, this is disadvantageous to you. If your opponent does this, you would want to consider a different time and/or place, unless you have no other choice.

    Sometimes using multiple breakthroughs will be more advantageous then a single attack. With only a single attack, this leaves the enemy many ways to configure to a new posture, or develop counter measures. Not only this, but having multiple breakthroughs leaves room for more tactical and strategic options, such as an envelope attack after the breakthroughs have been successfully made, or split the enemy into multiple pieces weakening him even further.

    See the following figure (9) for figures and diagrams of Breakthrough and envelopment movements.

    Figures 9: http://myspace-456.vo.llnwd.net/0140...08151456_l.gif

    I emphasize surprise and sudden attack movements for full effectiveness of this tactic.

  7. #6
    seńor brushman! brushman's Avatar
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    Edited in a small paragraph explaining logistics, in the first post.

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    keeping it ptailstyle P-Tail's Avatar
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    the logistics paragraph brings to mind eldar disruption from snipers. Only have rime to read the first post. GOOD! I like it a lot.

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    seńor brushman! brushman's Avatar
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    Thanks for reading, and the comments, P-Tail.

    I had posted this on another forums as well, and Commander_Vines kindly expanded on logistics. Here it is:

    Logistics as applied to table top 40k is best be discussed in terms two principals: supply of equipment and transport of that equipment to the necessary location.

    These two are fundamentally intertwined in 40k as supply of equipment will dictate the location that a unit must be transported to. If I have a large squad of fire warriors and I am fighting a hoard Ork army then logistics are fairly simple. The fire warriors pulse rifles (equipment) is well suited to killing Ork boys, so the logistical key to this situation is putting them in the best possible position (transport). As fire warriors cannot shoot long distances on the move they should be deployed in a good position at the beginning of the game. Orks hoards aren't particularly subtle in their assaults, so anywhere with clear fields of fire is good. Cover and the ease with which they can create a crossfire to support other units can increase the quality of a position.

    Static fire warriors are a fairly one dimensional unit in terms of equipment, so for my next example I will look at the highly customizable Imperial Guard Veteran Squad.
    As they can take virtually every weapon available to the Imperium, equipping them with the proper weapons for the job is easy, the key in this aspect is choosing the role. Do you need anti-horde? Then perhaps a full squad with shotguns, three flamers, and a powerfist veteran can serve you well. They have the equipment to seriously damage lightly armored troops as well as tieing up the squad in hand to hand combat afterwards. If you want raw firepower then equipping them with three plasma guns and a lascannon will give you plenty for a very cheap price. If tanks, especially those with indirect fire, are causing you problems then a squad with three meltas and a sergeant with melta bombs can solve it for you.

    With all these units the equipment aspect of logistics takes place before the game even begins; it occurs when you design your army. The transport aspect of logistics also must be addressed here. Where does your squad need to be to apply its firepower? With the assaulting flamer squad and the melta squad they must be very close so you must be able to transport them to their proper location. This can occur in two ways: first is through inflitration that the veterans posses, and second is through their ability to take a chimera. Particularly with a melta squad seeking to destroy indirect fire vehicles, infiltration is the better option. If it takes the two or three turns to cross the board then the damage to your lines will already be devastating. Infiltration transports the veterans to a location that allows them to strike on the first turn. With the flamer squad first turn strike isn't necessary, and not always even desireable; a few turns of fire from your heavy weapons will weaken the horde so that the veterans can stall them longer in assault, or even deliver the final crushing blow. For them a chimera is an attractive option as it not only protects the squad while moving into squad into position to strike, but adds to the anti-infantry firepower of the army. In this case equipment can increase the quality of transportation. Equipping the chimera with smoke launcher, extra armor, or track guards, increases the likelyhood that their transport to the necessary location will be successful. The logistics of the ranged squad is similar to that of the fire warriors, but with one added dimension. Because the firepower of the squad is concentrated in four models, protecting those models is key, so equipping the squad with more bodies might be advisable.

    To conclude I will examine that most flexible of units: the Space Marine Tactical Squad. This squad is aptly named because it can be equipped for any role, the recent introduction of traits gives them even more customizability. For the purposes of this example I will use a full 10 man squad with a missile launcher, flamer, veteran sergeant with a powerfist, and a rhino with extra armor and smoke. A fairly expensive unit, but one that is incredibly versetile. The squad's role can be changed halfway through the game if needed.

    They can begin the game as a core part of a battle line, pouring out firepower from their bolters with the missile launcher giving them some added punch. Suddenly, a group of deepstriking troops has appeared behind your lines. They can charge in with the flamer and powerfist and seriously damage if not destroying the foe, and even if they do not destroy the enemy, give the rest of the battle line the opportunity to relocate. Perhaps enemy fire has destroyed all the units on one flank. They can hop in their rhino, which has been hiding out of sight, and rush over to stop the advance. Here the pre-game logistical aspect of equipment, giving the squad a rhino, has given the squad the in-game logistical ability to transport themselves and their equipment to where it is needed.

    A skilled player will also think how he can interfere with his opponent's logistics.

    This is difficult out of game, though possible. Depending on the gaming environment misdirection through an outright lie might be looked upon with disdain, or tolerated. If you know your opponent likes to tailor his army, then say your are playing horde Orks and show up with Necrons. This can be done more subtly. Once, when I was new and would tailor my army in the extreme, a veteran player told me his "Orks wanted a rematch". I made an army with a dozen stealth suits and almost no low AP firepower. He proceeded to deploy a infantry heavy Necron army. He had successfully made me show up to battle with a poorly equipped army. I realized what he had done, laughed, and played it out (was actually a very close game decided in assault on the last turn), most importantly I don't tailor to a significant degree anymore. The viability of this tactic really depends on one's gaming group. Mine would normally frown on such a lie, but in this case it was appropriate because we also advocate balanced lists. Depending on one's group; judge to what degree this tactic would be acceptable, keeping in mind the goal is to have fun. To a lesser degree this can be done by talking excitedly about finally finish a trio of pirhanas, or wanting to try playing mech Tau for a change, but not implementing the new units or strategy in game.

    In game it is also possible to damage your opponent's logistics. This can be on the small scale of a Fish of Fury, where the Devilfishes interfere with their transport logistics just enough that the opponent cannot assault the fire warriors. It can also be done by denying an avenue of approach. This can be done in two ways. One is simply deploying so that an overwhelming amount of firepower is covering it, to the point where advancing would be suicidal. It can also be done by physically blocking a path. Take the tactical squad discussed earlier. Instead of hiding so the squad can rapidly relocate, the rhino could park itself between two groves of trees or a similar obstacle greatly hindering and attack through that area, and allowing you to focus your firepower on another avenue.

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    Dawn Under Heaven Triumph Of Man's Avatar
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    Do you need anti-horde? Then perhaps a full squad with shotguns, three flamers, and a powerfist veteran can serve you well. They have the equipment to seriously damage lightly armored troops as well as tieing up the squad in hand to hand combat afterwards.
    Do keep in mind that they need to actually reach their destination to put those short ranged weapons to use, and with the equivilant of a T-shirt for armour that doesn't happen very often. You're better off deepstriking a special weapons team (two flamers and a democharge) or a platoon command squad with flamers (four of them), that way you don't waste the BS4 of the veterans (you'll also find it considerably cheaper)

    If you want raw firepower then equipping them with three plasma guns and a lascannon will give you plenty for a very cheap price. If tanks, especially those with indirect fire, are causing you problems then a squad with three meltas and a sergeant with melta bombs can solve it for you.
    Now those tactics do work a treat. :yes:
    Last edited by Triumph Of Man; November 20th, 2006 at 02:26.


    Karmoon
    ... only triumph could turn pooing his pants into a good thing..

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    Junior Member OrdoXenos's Avatar
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    Very nice piece of tactical work here. I shudder to think how much time this took you, but it was certainly helpfull for me to keep in mind. I like the connection to history in the begining, and the whole article was well done.
    " These kroot fascinate me. I sense a changing, a capability of loving the emperor. We, the Ordo Xenos, fight the alien's hatred of the emperor, not its skin."
    - Inquisitor Tiberius Extius

    READ "THE EMPEROR' CLENSERS" in FLUFF

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