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  1. #1
    I'm a trap! Sophia's Avatar
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    Dark Apostle: Worst 40k Novel Ever?

    I tend not to like the vast majority of the warhammer novels. I've always had a healthy like for literature, and the content of most of the Black Library publications is, I find, to be pretty poor. The recent novels that deal with the Traitor Legions at the time of the Heresy, though, have all been wonderful, and had changed my mind of thinking that all Warhammer novels were just mediocre fantasy. However, a few days ago I got my hands on the recent release Dark Apostle, by Anthony Renolds. I hate to say this, but the vast majority of fanfiction I've stumbled upon is of a higher quality, mismatched fluff, uncanny pairups and all.

    Dark Apostle chronicles the Word Bearers' invasion of some backwater planet, and focuses on... well, one or two flat, one-dimensional Chaos Marines that are dry, cliched, and boring. Pages of introduction are written for almost half a dozen Imperials, who quickly die in the space of a single paragraph for seemingly no reason, or are strangely never mentioned again. The characters come across even more single-minded than those in the Space Wolf novels, and the plot development is about as slow as an average episode of Days of our Lives. That said, the most irritating thing I found with the novel, was the extreme lack of vocabulary shown by the author- I'm sure most of you can think of more than two words for "kill", "died", or "shot".

    As opposed to the recent novels about the Heresy, this book is little more than a disgrace, and I suggest everyone keep the hell away from it, or even better, cleanse it from the galaxy with SACRED PROMETHIUM. It does nothing good for GW's intellectual property, and if I was a potential Warhammer player, having read this novel would certainly keep me well away from any GW product.

    I give this zero and a half stars, mostly because the snarly dude on the cover looks epic.

    Thinking about this, I'm wondering if there are any other novels I should keep the hell away from, lest I be tainted by the epic amounts of fail involved. What Warhammer novels do you find to be the worst? Why?

    Last edited by Sophia; May 26th, 2008 at 04:08. Reason: Tainted has a T in it. D:
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  3. #2
    No King Rules Forever Dawnrunner's Avatar
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    I am in full agreement with you that as a story, Dark Apostle is little better than the average fanfic. It was such an awesome idea, though...too bad Mr. Reynolds butchered it. However, in terms of fluff and backstory the book has been invaluable to many Chaos Marine players and hobbyists for its in-depth (if somewhat overly verbose and poorly worded) descriptions of the Word Bearers. A lot of player knowledge of their organization, traditions, strategies, etc. comes straight from that book, and has inspired many a victorious army and brilliant conversion. Overall, I'd say the watchphrase for Dark Apostle is "undisciplined creativity gone awry" rather than "outright fecal matter", because die-hard backstory fiends like myself will enjoy that particular aspect of the book (at the cost of experiencing some truly painful literary moments) . May it serve as a cautionary example to all those of us with authorial aspirations.


    But if we're looking for true blasphemy against literature, let us look no farther than the heresies of C.S. Goto. I don't know whether he's trying to pass himself off as some kind of C.S. Lewis, but I know for sure that he doesn't deserve to lick Lewis's boots. His books are even worse than Dark Apostle. Cliched, insipid, about as deep as a dog's water dish, random, choppy, deus ex machina (no offense to the Omnissiah), "Movie Marines", mismatched fluff, no creativity, bad fanfic, trashy writing...all are words and phrases that spring instantly to mind when Goto is mentioned. Everything you said about Dark Apostle, Sophia, is magnified a thousandfold when applied to his books: Warrior Brood and Warrior Coven (with another one on the way). Apparently he also wrote the Dawn of War novel, but I haven't read that, and anyway the entire storyline was planned out for him. Whatever you do, don't imperil your soul or waste your money by buying his books.
    The Emperor set a fire in their hearts that they might burn the iniquitous and the impure from his sight. And the light of that flame shall be as a beacon to the faithful, a light that shines in the darkest places.

  4. #3
    Senior Member Konstantin's Avatar
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    C.S. Goto's work is bout on the same level as this DOOM: Repercussions of Evil, a Doom fanfic - FanFiction.Net Cept the Doom, and all of Peters story are so bad they're good, while C.S. Goto is just so bad i want to kill him, kinda like Uwe Boll.


    I have to post some of my favorite reveiws here:

    The OP will get a kick out of this review below.

    You have distilled the entire 600 pages of "Dark Apsostle" into a single paragraph. Unfortunately, you have decreaced the number of spelling errors only slightly.

    On the upswing, the twist is much more suprising without all the heavy handed foreshadowing. And you left out the revelation of the Necron god, which felt very much tacked on at the end, like a "I like the book, but it needs to have a new necron god in it. Put one of those in."




    What we have here may very well be the turning point of Literature: years from now, the coming generations will be able to look back at this point as the fulcrum on which the revolution happened. James Joyce was considered by many to be the most revolutionary writer of all; yet what those who considered him as such did not know was that there was another writer who would come and take his place: Peter Chimaera.

    Whereas in the past most writers had to confine their creations to the fascist rules of grammar, the author of this radical fiction pays no heed to such limitations; hence, he is able to portray human condition in a whole new light. The lack of a structure conveys the inconstancy of our own nature; the economical style employed serves to highlight the nihilism which has overcame modern man. Such innovative use of the form - or rather, lack of form - is unprencedented worldwide, thus why this humble reviewer believes that it is no exaggeration to call this a revolution.

    Had he stopped there, Chimaera would already be immortalized as one of the finest genius. Yet, he goes further. With striking lines which reveal a careful constructed social outlook, Chimaera aims to cause a real transformation to our socio-political scenario. For instance, at one point in the fiction, someone in a position of authority replies to our protagonist (a soldier), as he desperately refuses to give up on his mission: "No, John. You are the demons". What this uncover is the view that, to the ones in power, we are merely tools, to be betrayed when no longer needed: the patriot, the one who truly fights for his country, is the one who ends up as a "demon", while the corrupt politicians who commanded the war end up untouched. That so much could be said in one line is a testament to the writer's ability, as is the selective use of incorrect grammar, as if to show the evilness of our government.

    Finally, it is also important to consider the genre in which Chimaera chose to write this outstanding piece. Where other writers would write in the genre that suited best their style, without paying much attention to it - the genre is often considered a non-issue when developing a piece -, Chimaera carefully inserted himself in the fan fiction domain, a genre that is considered - or was considered, until this - to be a minor one. This choice indicates another stab at tradition, reaffirming the subversive nature of the author.

    In conclusion, we witness here the dawn of a new era. Henceforth, all classics will be studied only as the prelude to this outstanding piece. Those who wish to witness this revolution in writing should not miss the chance to read this innovative work.






    And so we have it: Peter Chimaera's long-awaited move into Doom fan fiction. And it does not disappoint.

    Something of a psychological thriller, "Repercussions of Evil" centres around the wartime experiences of John Stalvern, a fourteen-year veteren of the space marines. As demons slowly gain control of his base, John's life is explored in a series of flashbacks, which detail how he came to be in the marines, despite the fears of his father.

    Sadly, as the story begins, those fears are near to being realised. The rest of the story is a testament to what one man can achieve with only a plasma rifle at his disposal, as well as John's eventual downfall, via a shocking twist that I won't spoil for you here.

    As always, Chimaera's distinctive style of writing is evident throughout, and really helps to get across the underlying message that war will ultimately destroy us all.

    All in all, one of his best; Five Stars.




    Brilliant, simply brilliant. Repercussions of Evil is a powerful exploration of the demons that haunt the human soul. Was John physically turned into a zombie, or did he lose his humanity in the battle against the demons? As is said, they who fight monsters should take care not to become monsters themselves. And what is it that separates humans from monsters? "Repercussions of Evil" does not give us an answer, but suggests that there is something monstrous within each and every one of us.

    Truly an outstanding work.



    If you like this story/reviews, i suggest reading all the others.
    Last edited by Konstantin; May 25th, 2008 at 04:38.

  5. #4
    LO Zealot The Fifth Horseman's Avatar
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    C.S. Goto's work is bout on the same level as this DOOM: Repercussions of Evil, a Doom fanfic - FanFiction.Net Cept the Doom, and all of Peters story are so bad they're good, while C.S. Goto is just so bad i won't to kill him, kinda like Uwe Boll.
    *clicks link*
    *brain fart*
    That... is... true... evil.

  6. #5
    Professional Lurker sithjack's Avatar
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    The sad thing is that with some more words, grammar, spelling, and work Repercussions could be something halfway decent to good. Whereas Goto isn't going anywhere no matter how much work you put into it.

    The characters come across even more single-minded than those in the Space Wolf novels
    I always enjoyed Ragnar, Sven, and Strybjorn, Lars too. They were decent characters under King especially compared to other marines. Under Leightner, not so much.
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  7. #6
    Member Brother_Captain_Devon's Avatar
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    I have read many of the Black Library novels. I am a HUGE fan of the first three Horus Heresy novels, involing Garviel Loken. Since the first three, the books have been going down hill, but have somewhat redeamed themselves with Legion. The dark angels novel was horrid. It didn't live up to the hype in the least.

    As for the Dark Apostle novel, I thought it was a better then average BL novel. BL in the description for there short story contests specifically says that it needs the action of other novels. So the books from BL are more ment to be entertaining then good literature. They are no Future War or Ring World books there.

    IMO all BL books are just action. There is very little drama or depth to the stories, but they are as i said entertaining. And that is what they are meant to be.

    I thought that Dark Apostle was very entertaining and a true page turner. The reason why a lot of the BL books seem like Fanfic is because they are, just Fanfic that won a contest.
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  8. #7
    Benevolent Dictator CaptainSarathai's Avatar
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    best three books:

    '15 Hours' and 'Riders of the Dead':
    both have some intensely REALISTIC combat scenes. I have read battle-portions of both books aloud to friends and they didn't even know it was fiction. 15 Hours chronicles a Guardsmans life on the front line, and reads like a WW1 Epic. Similarly, Riders of the Dead follows the stories of two one-time comrads as one falls to chaos and the other fights for the Empire and Kislev.

    'Execution Hour':
    incredible book about space combat- also realistic. if you dont play BFG, you will.

    And true, the Horus Heresy books aren't bad, but they're "too human", too much like normal Sci-Fi, and if I want to read 'normal' sci-fi, i'll read 'better' scifi like "Ender's Saga"

    Worst books: Eldar Prohpecies (Gotto), Space-Wolf and the Ulramarines series (too fan-ficky)
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  9. #8
    Senior Member Dr. Paris's Avatar
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    Guant isn't bad. It gets better with each one. I agree that 15 hours is very well done. It's one of those reads that won't blow you away, but it's just good. It captures 40k very well, and is ultimately satisfying.

    Space Wolf.....man. It sucks. I mean, it sucks bad. Not as bad as Dark Apostle apparently, but my god. The second book started off so badly I just left the Omnibus in a different time zone (literally).

    I think the books that make the best novels are where the combat is short, brutal, and intense, or a long drawn out attrition type thing. I shouldn't feel like a summer action flick.

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