Hobby skills applied to a career in Teaching - Warhammer 40K Fantasy
 

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  1. #1
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    Hobby skills applied to a career in Teaching

    Hello everyone,

    I'm in the process of applying to train as a Teacher; I'm writing out a long personal statement for the application. One of the areas is;

    'What can you offer apart from your own specialist subject?

    Here, you should focus on other skills you have that would be of benefit to a school. '


    Here's my question; How would you desrcibe your Hobbying skills (any and all aspects; Painting, Modelling and even GMing Role-Playing Games like DnD and Dark Heresy) to benefit teaching, or the school? I know there are a lot of very bright people here on LO, so any thoughts?


    Montyhaul's Models[/size][/indent]
    Warhammer minis for sale[/size][/indent]

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  3. #2
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    IIRC there is only a limited amount of space on the personal statement part of the application (in UK anyway) so I would advise focusing on more relevant things which might pertain to teaching. I'm not sure many of the skills in tabletop gaming are as transferable as gamers would like, perhaps you could mention that you would be able to run an after school club of sorts, or that you have good painting/art skills (do you?). But I would probably only mention the hobby after more relevant avenues have been exhausted.

    Having said that though, there are a number of teachers here on LO, and I'm only ITT myself so I don't know what they're looking for really. Other people might be able to help more. What subject are you teaching?

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    Son of LO ArtificiallyEnhanced's Avatar
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    This is an interesting question. As Stonehambey said, there's always the "after school club" route to explore, but you could also explore the decision making and leadership of running a campaign/GMing D+D, the creativity of the painting and modelling side of the hobby, and also the mathematical side of things with the statistics involved in the dice rolling, as when wargaming we are constantly comparing statistics and evaluating them on their merits in comparison with other stats. I don't know exactly what your strengths and weaknesses are within these realms, but they could nicely balance an application by adding another side to your skillset, or reinforce your strengths.

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    Excellent suggestions, thanks, just what I was after.

    Stonehamby, I'm aiming for Primary teaching. I hear you loud and clear about keeping it relevant. I was thinking along the lines of administrating a group of players, managing an 'audience' etc.

    ArtificiallyEnhanced, thanks, I hadn't thought of the number-crunching, though I'm more of a modeller than a gamer, so I might not use that, but it is a good suggestion. After school gaming clubs are a great thought - I spotted a couple of Space Marine books owned by pupils in the upper years.

    Thanks for the food for thought
    Montyhaul's Models[/size][/indent]
    Warhammer minis for sale[/size][/indent]

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    Well being male and going for primary should work in your favour, as their is a national shortage of male primary teachers.

    Good luck

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    Quote Originally Posted by Stonehambey View Post
    Well being male and going for primary should work in your favour, as their is a national shortage of male primary teachers.

    Good luck
    Ditto this, The one thing I would say though is, especially with a primary agegroup, is don't make too great a focus on it. As the hobby is intended for persons aged 13+ (not that this stops many 10 year olds in my local GW!) some schools may frown upon the nature of the hobby and it might be detrimental to the application, especially with obsessive nature of children at this age.

    The other problem may be the parents. Unless you or the school (yeah right) are willing to provide the models for it, then you'll have unhappy parents beating a path to your door demanding to know why they "have" to spend £75 on their son so that he can take part in a school club.

    So whilst I'd encourage you to give it a go, don't lean too heavily on it. All the best though, and let us know if you find somewhere.

    AE

  8. #7
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    Dear All Concerned,

    I do agree with the others who say you should stick with other ideas, but if you are totally set on the game as an extra skill, heres a bit of food for thought:

    Warhammer is a strategy based game, that requires memorization, thinking through strategies, concentration, luck, mathematics, and a large amount of responsibility to play. These are a few things I take it to need. Now, you can apply these to general teaching in a few ways:


    Memorization: Personally, memorizing the rules of three separate forms of warhammer (LotR, 40K, and Fantasy) taught me how I learn, and how my brain remembers things. This helped me with my studies, by allowing me to memorize faster, by knowing what to study.

    Strategy: The game makes you think, plain and simple. Unlike video games, which require little time, energy, or strategy, Warhammer is simply a more complex form of chess (you can use that to draw in teachers) with different pieces, and more complex rules and strategies.

    Concentration: Not only in list making, modeling, and painting, even playing requires a large amount of concentration, which will teach kids to pay close attention to their surrounds, and can be applied to study skills.

    Responsibility: Caring for models, money, tools, equipment, paint, and playing in a sportsmanship filled environment can teach kids the right values, and responsibility needed later in life. I know that everything I buy comes out of my own money, so it taught me to choose well, and never waste the things I purchase. Taking care of all the equipment necessary has taught me to value my belongings, because if I break it, I may never get something as good ever again. (painting, modeling, etc.) And teaching kids that the game is about having fun, not winning, will carry over into sports and basic life standards.

    Just my two cents to throw in there...

    -ythc
    Fluff Master

    You are not your avatar. You are not your knowledge of the rules or your last article. You are not your post count. You are not your rep. You are not your title. You are not your blog. You are not your painting or modeling skills. You are not your location, rating, profile comments, friends or armies. You are not your signature.

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    Greetings, I'm a first year teacher who has been in the hobby for more than a few years. There aren't a whole lot of skills that transfer into the classroom. The only real one that I can think of is patience. Miniatures and teaching both require tremendous amounts of patience, especially in my field (music.) It takes a long time for students to develop the skills you are asking them to learn just like it takes someone a long time to learn how to paint and build an army. With both teaching and painting sometimes I sit back and am amazed at how far things have progressed over a few short months.

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