Thinner paints = better coverage ?? - Warhammer 40K Fantasy
 

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  1. #1
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    Thinner paints = better coverage ??

    I've known since starting painting that you need to thin down paints before you use them. This I've done and found that eventually it started to just start to look clumpy with the brush seeming to push the pigment to the edge of strokes.

    Then I noticed a thread where someone had mentioned filling up new GW paints to the top with water. A huge amount more thinning than I had previously tried.

    Anyways, gave it a go with not quite so much water but certainly more than I had before and there it was, prefectly smooth strokes in a thinner layer with a better coverage. I expected smoother and thinner, but a better coverage? Works with all the paints I've used so far...

    Question is, why?


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  3. #2
    A bit of alright. Walex's Avatar
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    I would imagine it has something to do with surface tension.
    Up, up and away!

  4. #3
    things will change minus_t's Avatar
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    979 (x8)

    To go further, you will get 'better' (see later for thoughts on 'better') coverage with thinned paints because the water (or other thinning medium) allows the particles of pigment in the paint to spread over the surface of the mini in a more even manner.

    Of course, it depends on what you mean by better. Paint that completely covers an area would have great coverage, but may leave huge brushstrokes, clog up detail etc.
    This would all be considered 'worse' painting, but may well cover the mini with paint in a more effecient manner.

    So, assuming that better implies covering an area with paint, whilst avoiding brushstrokes, lumps and/or clogging detail, thinned paints do indeed cover better!
    You may well find that because the pigment is more spread out over the model, you will have to do several coats of some colours to get an even finish, but this is (IMO) a small price to pay for 'good coverage'.

    /irrelevant ranting.

    -t.
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  5. #4
    Oberstleutnant Phormio's Avatar
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    To add to -T reply, you may also want to add surface tension breaker to the mix, especially if you've thinned the paint too far.

    This might be a silly question but are you removing the excess from the brush before you apply, or are you blobbing the paint on?

    Paint choice also helps - I personally don't like GW paints (except for the metalics) but that's a personal preference.

    Brushes are important. A good brush will leave better results.

    Finally that bit about filling the pot with water - I wouldn't do that unless I was trying to revive a paint that may have partially dried out. I always water down the paint on a plate or something like that just before I use it. A few dots of paint and then add water (or other things) to suit. There will be times you want the paint a little thicker and if you water it down in the pot then you're removing some of your options as to the consistancy you want from the paint.

    Hope this helps
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  6. #5
    Murder omgitsduane's Avatar
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    266 (x8)

    this doesn't work for the shining gold color I've found out, the water WILL NOT mix with the tub of paint and sits softly on top of it everytime I open it, sure I can mix it in by throwing it about but when I try to paint with it mixed in, it comes out too watery and a lot of the gold is lost in useless layers of water.

  7. #6
    Paintwater cup != tea mug catbarf's Avatar
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    I really recommend thinning on the palette, not in the pot. When you add water to the pot, it doesn't actually chemically bind with the paint, so it still separates and even if shaken vigorously can begin to separate before you even touch the paint to the model.
    If you think Mathammer doesn't work and dice cannot be predicted, there's a whole field of mathematics called probability that would like to disagree.

  8. #7
    Keeper of Records and Ale King Ulrik Flamebeard's Avatar
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    1372 (x8)

    You will find that mixing in the pot can work but often you'll find the water separates from the paint, leaving a layer of water on top. It is always better to mix onto a palette. That way you can control how much paint you put on and how watery it becomes.

    I find myself in agreement with Minus_t here. You'll need to do more layers with thin paints, but it is so much more worth it. The smoother finish is worth that extra amount of time used on that extra layer or two. Trust us (re: trust me, not him. He = fail).

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  9. #8
    Normal member Fox D: Toastee's Avatar
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    254 (x8)

    Topic change?

    Rather than start a new topic, I'll post here, as I think its a similar kinda question really.

    http://i2.photobucket.com/albums/y38...e/IMGP1323.jpg

    When painting the Piranha, the red keeps coming out with brush strokes marking it.
    Is it just a matter of adding more layers of red paint? Or does it need to be thinned more?

    Thanks for any help
    Last edited by Toastee; April 18th, 2008 at 17:32.
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  10. #9
    things will change minus_t's Avatar
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    979 (x8)

    Is that Blood Red, Toastee?
    If so, you really need a colour or two 'below' it to get flat coverage...

    I'd really reccomend Mechrite Red, it is made of awesome (coverage, that is. I'm not hugely sold on the colour itself), but if you don't fancy that, try going:
    Black
    Scorched Brown
    Dark Flesh
    Red Gore
    Blood Red
    Blood Red + a teeny tiny teeny tiny bit of yellow for highlights.

    It almost certainly isn't because of the paint, thinning too much or no, Blood Red (and, to be honest, most reds I've tried) have pretty poor coverage, so you do need a base colour to work up from, or to use a foundation as a starting point.

    -t.
    minus_t's painting log! Now with: More Wolves and Blue Robots!
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  11. #10
    Normal member Fox D: Toastee's Avatar
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    254 (x8)

    Aye, but its on a Black -> Red Gore base already.
    Then is gets highlighted with Blazing Orange before being red inked.

    Would the way you suggested change the red in anyway? Or would it just allow for it to cover better?
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