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  1. #1
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    effects on mini's

    hi all

    well ive bin over at coolminiornot.com
    and one thing i have noticed is a lot of the mini's have this custy wethered look which is very impresive .

    now i have looked in the articles section of sed site and i cant find the method of this style
    as its not under wethereing or effects.

    if anyone can piont me in the right direction please do so guys

    cheers


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  3. #2
    LO's Resident Time Lord Canew's Avatar
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    457 (x8)

    The short answer: drybrushing and glazing works well.

    The long answer will unfortunately have to come from someone else. I'm not super great at these techniques, and probably won't be for a long time, but you should check out the sticky posts at the top of the painting forum. You'll find some links to some very informative sites.

    For my money, one of the best is BrushThralls.com. Not that I'm any shade of expert at painting now, but that site has taught me a LOT, at least about the requisite skills, theories, and "How'd they do that?" questions.

    Ultimately, practice is the best teacher, but sites like that will show you WHAT to practice, at least.
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    Check out my WIP thread here (Clicky!)

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    A bit of alright. Walex's Avatar
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    We'ld have to know exactly you meant for a pertinent explanation to be made- there's just too many ways of weathering something but all end up different.
    Up, up and away!

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    Member Knight of awesome's Avatar
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    Weathering can be done in many different ways, and there is rarely any wrong way of doing it. Dry brushing was already said, so I'm going to advise a second way of creating weathering. The only problem is you don't want to go over-board with it because it tends to over power the model.

    Making Mud Weathering

    Materials:
    - Sand
    - Brown-ish paints
    - Paint-Brush
    - White or PVA Glue

    Directions:
    Mix the PVA or white glue with the sand and the darkest brown paint you have (scorch-brown for GW paints)

    CAREFULLY apply part of the mixture on to the weathered part of the model, DON'T go over-board it is very hard to get this mixture of after you realized you don't like it

    Paint hight-lights onto the mud when it drys, and near the to of the weathered paint a fleshy color (dwarf flesh) to represent dried mud.

    and there you have it Mud Weathering!

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    ok guys i think i might have miss-explained wot i was after

    ok eres a few links of examples

    http://www.librarium-online.com/foru...ml#post1101127

    http://www.librarium-online.com/foru...tml#post977848

    http://www.librarium-online.com/foru...tml#post986109

    http://www.librarium-online.com/foru...ml#post1094413

    http://www.librarium-online.com/foru...tml#post980823

    hope this helps explain the effects i am affter

    cheers guys

    oh cumming soon are pics off my new grey knight terminators
    and ..............dummm dummmm dummmmmmm!.............a soulgrinder

    lol

  7. #6
    LO's Resident Time Lord Canew's Avatar
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    457 (x8)

    Well, for the "chips" and "dings" on the armour, there was a WD article on this a while back (the issue that introduced the new Dark Angels codex. I forget which) that went into detail on how to do stuff like this.

    I couldn't recreate that advice if I tried, but the quick and dirty way to do it is to first paint a VERY dark mark (usually black or brown), then highlight the lower edge of it. By that I mean, trace the bottom edge of your mark with another color. The easiest way to do it is use boltgun metal (since armour is theoretically supposed to be metal that's "painted" like a car is), but some people have had success using a light color used to highlight the model (i.e., that light blue you used to highlight Ultramarines Blue, etc.). Experiment to find the best color for your tastes.

    Finally, run a VERY thin line of white along the highlight, which represents light reflecting off the damage.

    Try this out on sprue or something until you find the look you want. Works for me.

    EDIT: One more thing I do remember from the article was that you should choose carefully where and how you place the damage marks, and don't go crazy with it, or it will wind up looking like what the article called "abstract camouflage." I think, in some of the examples you've cited, that's exactly where the artist went wrong. Sometimes a couple really well done claw marks in the right spot says more than dozens of tiny little chips. Less is more.
    Last edited by Canew; July 8th, 2008 at 17:57.
    Mickey: "You're just making this up as you go along!"
    The Doctor: "Yuuuup. But I do it brilliantly!"

    Check out my WIP thread here (Clicky!)

    The rules (Clicky!) Read 'em, know 'em, love 'em.

    Peace, through superior firepower.

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