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  1. #1
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    why thin paints?

    personally I have had great results in my painting without ever thinning them, in fact I prefer the vibrant color to the dullness thinning seems to give

    now is the reason for thinning paints purely financial or is there a practical reason I should know about--- if your touch is delicate thinned paints are no better than pure ones , save they give less clean color


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    Keeper of Records and Ale King Ulrik Flamebeard's Avatar
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    Paints are thinned because they give better coverage. Using paint straight out of the pot might give you a strong colour in one or two layers but you risk covering detail with thick paint. Adding a drop or two of water can help you paint the area without obscuring details. The downside is of course it'll not be done in a single layer, to get a good solid colour it can take quite a few layers, depending on how thinned your paint is. But in the end, you can get just as strong and vibrant colour from thinned paint as you can from using it straight from the pot.

    Kuffy

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    Quote Originally Posted by King Ulrik Flamebeard View Post
    Paints are thinned because they give better coverage. Using paint straight out of the pot might give you a strong colour in one or two layers but you risk covering detail with thick paint. Adding a drop or two of water can help you paint the area without obscuring details. The downside is of course it'll not be done in a single layer, to get a good solid colour it can take quite a few layers, depending on how thinned your paint is. But in the end, you can get just as strong and vibrant colour from thinned paint as you can from using it straight from the pot.

    Kuffy

    hmmmmm will have to try it more then, the details thing would be alot easier I guess with thinner paint. real question is , is there a sizable improvement in the details over regular single coat painting?--- I mean can you do more with thin paints?
    Last edited by Concilliator; September 16th, 2008 at 02:09.

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    I think this topic is pretty popular and has been covered a lot on this forum (after all, a lot of my 8-month knowledge came from this forum) so you should probably do some searching to get more info

    but in my own experience (in agreement to what was written here), I found that thin paint is a little nicer on the finish. with thick, bloopy paint you can get clumps on ur mini and also streaks from ur brush. You can also get the same thing from thinned paint, which has dried a little. I did that a few times, when I started applying the next layer before the first one fully dried, it's annoying.

    I don't think u can do more, it just looks better.
    But actually, not that I think of it, I think you get a bit nicer color blending with thinner layers. If you wanna do really good blending (w/o going to extremes) you gotta thin the paint a lot.

    Which brings me to the annoying part of thinning - running paint. Sometimes the paint can run onto other areas, and that's annoying too.

    Anyway, I'm writing too much. I hope some of it was worth it.

    PS. It also depends on what paint u're using! Some paint might be good to go from the pot.

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    A bit of alright. Walex's Avatar
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    Thin paints give an even finish- which is very important if you're looking for strong colours. That should be reason enough- brush strokes look nasty.
    Up, up and away!

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