Weathered, Chipped and Damaged Armour - Warhammer 40K Fantasy
 

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  1. #1
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    Weathered, Chipped and Damaged Armour

    hello LOers!

    I am in need of advice on the painting of heavily damaged/weathered Space Marine armour! So I'm asking anyone who has previously modelled and/or painted damaged armour to post pictures and a run-through of their mini(s)! Don't be shy, anyone's minis have a 95% chance of being better than mine!!

    The reason is: I have recently come across the Celestial Lions chapter and am amazed at their paint scheme and back ground, so have decided to collect a force in the hopefully not too distant future. Their fluff states (according to Lexicanum) that they were all but obliterated by Orks in the Third War for Armaggedon, currently only 96 members survive and have sworn to die defending their fallen brothers' bodies upon the field of battle.

    So, please post pictures of scraped, chipped, muddied, rusted and so forth Space Marines (Celestial Lions if you got any . It would also be of great help if you could shed some light on how you paint and model your battle damaged armour.


    Thanks heaps for any and all help!

    Luke.


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  3. #2
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    Painting scraped/chipped armour is fairly easy. Remember that normally, less is more.

    Things typically scrape and chip on edges and it's much less common for arbitrary chips to appear in the middle of a shoulderpad (for example). The best way to do it I find is, once you've identified where you want to paint your scrape, do a very thin line of chaos black. Over the top of this, paint orange until you have almost entirely covered the chaos black -the black is only there to serve as a very thin edging. Finally, paint boltgun metal over the top of the orange to show the metal underneath. The net effect will be a very thin black line, very thin orange (unless you want it to look really rusty I advise leaving little orange visible) and then the metal effect.

    That covers painting on chips - if you choose to drill/cut small holes in to represent damage, the same painting effect applies.

    Take the time to consider where would normally be chipped - kneepads, toes, fingers, edges of shoulders, ridges on helmets etc. and if you restrict yourself mainly to these areas it will look more realistic.

    For mud, the best way to do it is also the most time consuming. Thin down brown paint until it's almost the consistency of milk, very very watery. Then paint it on upto maybe midway up the thigh. Truth be told, you shouldn't even be able to see it almost - if you can clearly see it, your paint isn't watered down enough. Now, simply reapply layer on top of layer ontop of layer, each time working down the model to the feet. Naturally, you will end up with the feet/ankles having had multiple layers and a muddied effect will emerge. Remember not to go overboard - most mud effects look rubbish because people simply paint brown on the bottom of their troopers/tanks. That looks jarring artificial. If you are taking the time to paint battle damage on every single marine then it's worth spending the extra time to at least do realistic mud!

    Blood is trickier and tbh unless a model is injured I wouldn't bother. It's the same technique as mud but it's rare that a "bloodied sword" actually looks good, but it's all personal taste really.

    Hope this helps.

  4. #3
    Senior Member The Green Meep's Avatar
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    Don't forget that wet blood is shiny and dry blood is more dry-ish

    Armor chips commonly chips on the edges, although there might be a large chip in the middle of a shoulder pad, where he has been cut by a chainsword or something...

    Chips tend to be white or metal if the armor was painted (modeled to be painted), or if the armor is supposed to be well, actual armor, in a certain color, then take nicks out of the armor with a knife or something hard, and paint these nicks a slightly darker color.

    Mud is pretty easy: get some PVA glue, rub it on the model, then paint the glue brown, in a muddy color.

    That's how I do it, good luck!

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    I'd argue against mixing PVA and brown paint for mud, it'll look shockingly bad to be honest. The net effect will seem like you made a mistake basing.

    Less = More

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    Senior Member The Green Meep's Avatar
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    I didn't mean to say mix the PVA glue and the paint and then paint with that, I meant put some glue on the figure, and then paint the hardened glue.

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    Chilli Fueled Heretic danjones87's Avatar
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    Chips painted.

    I used a darker colour for the chip, then highlighted the underside with a small bit of lighter than basecoat paint.
    Simple and easy with a steady hand.
    Chips modelled.



    I used a pin vice to make small holes in the plasticard and then edged these out with a knife, tapering the card so the hole was wider at the out side than it was inside.
    I painted the weathered areas with a bit of tin bitz and boltgun washed with browns and blacks to show the paint chipping away to the dirty bare metal.

    Oil and grease

    I add a little oil and grease to my tanks by drying inks with a hairdryer to leave tide marks in areas.

    Burnt and used barrels



    I have added some scorched marks to this plasma rifle and plasmablastgun by using mixes of scorched brown and chaos black moving away from the tip of the barrel. You can use a spong to get a more rough random effect, and a streaking brush to show extreme areas of heat expell. Oil paints are much better for this effect layered ontop of acrylic paints.

    Anything else you would like guidance on?

    Dan

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    @ danjones, I like the look of the scorched plasma cannon and I've seen it done elsewhere. Have you any advice on painting it when its really clean... I can't remember where I've seen it but it looked really cool, it's kinda just a really neat black which fades away from the nozzle... I hope I've explained it well, do you know what I mean?

    @ Green_Meep, I can see where you are coming from, in that you'd represent mud, as opposed to dust, which the other layered would show. Do you have any pics? As I have seen the dust effect and really like it, but am still interested in the style which you employ.

    @ Indigo, great post!! really useful information!! Have you got any pictures of the dusty mud effect? I have seen them on CMoN, but searching those words doesn't bring any good minis. Any links?


    Cheers!

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    Senior Member The Green Meep's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by luke.noorda View Post
    @ Green_Meep, I can see where you are coming from, in that you'd represent mud, as opposed to dust, which the other layered would show. Do you have any pics? As I have seen the dust effect and really like it, but am still interested in the style which you employ.

    Cheers!
    Sadly, I do not possess any pictures of such a feature, I will however, after i finish one of my saurus, hopefully by today.

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    Senior Member krushkilldestroy's Avatar
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    For metallic parts a mix of black and metal is good (black metal hehe) or a black undercoat, but that only works for the "worn out" look.

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    Also, some gloss over the mud would make it look wet, possibly more realistic. Then, you might cut off the mini's feet, such that it looks like it's in some knee-deep mud. (on the base)

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