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  1. #1
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    My First Painted Army

    Hello,

    I'm fairly new to the Warhammer tabletop and this forum as well. I just recently finished painting my first army (Necrons) and i'm about to start playing, but I would like to hear some advice. Any comments on my painting technique and suggestions are welcome. Hopefully I can learn how to better myself as I expand my new army.

    For paints I undercoated with chaos black, a coat of Orkhide Shade. Then boltgun metal for the joints and bones. With some mithril silver for The skulls and spines. Then scorpion green for the weapons.

    I apologize for my picture skills

    Warrior
    Warriors
    Warriors
    Yes the one on the left has some red on him. It was my original colour scheme.

    Destroyer
    Destroyer Back

    Destroyer Lord
    Destroyer Lord
    Lord

    Thank you for any comments.

    Malen,


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  3. #2
    Junior Member BoKlulz's Avatar
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    It seems you have two solid concepts down flat, base coats and block painting. For a first timer your models are freakishly clean, no real issue placing your silver, as the green is for the most part untouched, and I cant spy any overlapping colors anywhere. Bravo!

    A secluded pallet is also the key to a good artist, so keep that scheme and your army will look great!

    Some new things for you to try. If your wanting your silvers to really give an impression of depth and shadow, try some of GW's new wash paints.
    Generally, washes are inks or formula based paints that go over most models like you were brushing on paint, but its intention is to saturate where you throw the wash in order to create a shadow.
    It will drop into the cracks and corners and around edges to create shadows and increase the depth and detail that your silvers have covered. Helping it get to those places with brushwork is key. After that, if you wanted to go and clean up the flat areas with silver again once the wash has dried (completely!) so you are not left with any streaky or patchy wash color on any flat areas. (the chest on the destroyer, bolts on the arms, etc...)if you leave the wash in the recesses, you can really improve your metals in a simple manner that way.

    The other thing is, paint, and water.
    For first time painters, the consistency of paint might seem straight forward, going from paint pot to model seems okay. but it tends to get gunky after a while, and in all honesty your paints will last longer if you put a drop or two of water onto your pallet while you work with a particular color. Finding the right consistency isn't an exact science, so a little bit of pallet work is involved if your a scientist like me, different paints will be different thickness, especially GW's.
    The OTHER reason you want to water down almost every color you use is because watered down paint flows better, and covers more area than straight paint. Be careful though, on the flip side, adding too much water can turn a paint into a glaze or a wash, which wont cover well if your looking to add a straight color to something like a flat black, so watch out.

    I speak of this now because i have seen the coils on the guns, and it looks like that might have been a little taxing for you to cleanly cover up those coils with green, especially if your afraid of mucking the black gun itself.

    Remember that cleaning up a mistake on a miniature with a base coat is very simple to do in most cases (the big exception being bright colors and white) so don't be afraid to water down some paints and get used to trying multiple coats of a watered down color to achieve a bright and smooth finish on odds and ends like that green. Slapping colors on in one coat makes for obscured detail.

    I'm sure others will have more to say, but i put in my 2 cents. I'll be looking forward to more, or how my suggestions worked out.

  4. #3
    Member zarkzervo's Avatar
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    I won't comment so much on the painting, but I really like the color scheme.

    For the picture, I have a suggestion of something you should try. Try taking the picture from further away. You probably have high enough resolution to crop the miniature part of the picture and then not have to resize it to be able to post it.

    This will give you more depth sharpness, i.e., you can get a sharp view of most parts of the miniature.

    And some other minor thing, is that you should try to get a hold of a large piece of white paper as a background as this will bring out the miniature details more. It will remove any background clutter and bring attention to the model.

    Keep up the good work, and I always enjoy pictures
    Hit eit steg
    og dit eit steg.
    Så vandrar vi fram på skuleveg.
    - An old viking war chant

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    A black wash and then light drybrush of the original colors would give it some nice depth.

  6. #5
    LO's Resident Time Lord Canew's Avatar
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    I second the need for washes. Even if you don't drybrush some highlights afterward (which is also highly recommended), the wash is practically mandatory. You have indeed learned how to block out sections and lay down color in a thin, smooth, natural layer. Well done, but it's really only the first stage. If you want to really improve them, you ought to wash them.

    The simplest way to do this is with the citadel washes (I recommend Badab Black), since you can go straight from the pot, but if you can't/won't find those, take some straight black paint and water it down significantly, preferably with a drop or two of dishwashing liquid or Future Floor Wax mixed in to aid the flow.

    Naturally, you don't want to just slather the stuff on, as with too much wash you'll make a HUGE mess of your fine job, and you run the risk of messing up the gauss rods, which would be a real crime. Instead, be sure to blot your brush on a paper towel -- don't just go straight from palette/pot to model. You'll make rivers of the stuff going all sorts of places you didn't intend. With small amounts, you can control where you want it to go. Chest plates and joints need it the most. It takes little work and time to do it, especially with necrons, and I promise you if you're careful you will LOVE the results.

    Good luck, and post more pics! We like pics here!
    Last edited by Canew; February 6th, 2009 at 15:25.
    Mickey: "You're just making this up as you go along!"
    The Doctor: "Yuuuup. But I do it brilliantly!"

    Check out my WIP thread here (Clicky!)

    The rules (Clicky!) Read 'em, know 'em, love 'em.

    Peace, through superior firepower.

  7. #6
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    I do have the Badab Blac wash. I tried it very early on when I first started painting. I went over my boltgun metal with it and I always thought it made the metal look dirty, but I believe I've been using it wrong. I will try again and update with pictures

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