3) WFB Terrain II - Barn - Warhammer 40K Fantasy
 

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    Senior Member stayscrunchyinmilk's Avatar
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    3) WFB Terrain II - Barn

    Here is my Warhammer Fantasy Battle Project II - Barn
    (To go as part of my main scenery journal)
    link:
    http://www.librarium-online.com/foru...beginning.html

    Materials and tools:

    Balsa,
    Plasticard,
    Sand,
    Plastic bits for flavour,
    Scorched static grass.

    Knife, file, clippers, drill, PVA glue, superglue (cheap is better) Old brush (glue application)

    A Balsa Farm Barn:

    Inspited by sho'nuff's Iron Chef scenery competition, I have decided to make a wooden Farm Barn for WFB. As part of the Iron chef competition it needed to be wood.

    I started by getting the dimensions of my barn, and marking them out on pencil on a sheet of paper.
    #Note# = Whilst doing the roof think about how your walls are going to join - you may want to add a extra mm to the width / height. I also reccommend measuring alond the end walls for the length of your roof, and adding 2.5mm to the length of one (if using 2.5mm balsa) for where they join.

    The limit to the width of my barn pieces was the width of my balsa sheets at about 15cm wide and about 1m long. (1.5mm thick and 2.5mm thick sheets - about £1.20-1.50 each. you will use plenty though.)

    I then got a pin, and put the paper over my balsa, and punched through the corners, and joined them in on the balsa with a pencil. I then cut themn out with a sharp knife - I used a scalpel as I can change the blades for about 10p each, and they blunt very quickly.

    The main sections were made from 2.5mm balsa, for extra strength and added contact with the base / each other (giving the glue more chance to hold)

    Here is some of the Progress at this point:










    I assembled the main body of barn, adding some "V" shaped balsa at the corners - I let them set on one piece first (Using balsa wood), and thought about how the walls were going to join - if you need to set it a wall width away from the edge use a offcut as a spacer:


    I then assembled the barn using PVA, letting it set before attaching it to plasticard using cheap Superglue.
    - I used 1.5mm plasticard here, and squirted the cheap superglue onto it before putting the balsa on - You won't be able to remove it without breaking it, and it'll be stuck in a second. Plasticard is also preferable as it won't warp or chip easily.

    I let that all set and if any edges needed filing I gave them a generous coat of superglue - you can't file balsa on the grain without risking a break, but liberally applying cheap superglue stops this problem.

    I then added the roof - a bit of overhang isn't bad here. you could also make the roof removeable at this point if you wanted to.

    Images:








    I then added wooden boards to the exterior - I got my 1.5mm sheets and hand cut it into 8-10mm strips.
    #note# = To cut the boards at 45degrees at the top measure the angle on a paper, with both lines marking it out fairly long. Place your sheet against one line, with the length of the required board to where the lines meet and cut along the other line as a guide. flip the offcut over and It's the beginning of another board! (only works at 45 degrees)

    I reccommend starting at the corners, affixing with PVA and stopping periodically to let it set.


    To make doorframes /windows I got some 2.5mm bits and cut them to fit.




    When finished I made it a little more robust by adding a line of cheap superglue to the bottom and top, pushing in any bits that have warped a little / not set to the main body.

    Next, I got a box of chocolate fingers, and ate them with a cup of tea whilst musing.
    Then i chopped the box into slate tile chunks. I kept a couple of strips ofthe bits on the box where it folds for the roof
    top (see later)
    I used PVA and started doing rows of tiles - starting at the bottom and using a bit of overhang.
    I would reccomend doing no more than 2-3 rows at a time, as if you accidentally nudge one the rows underneath may move.






    It should look like this before you do the top (With the bits from the box where it folds you saved:
    #note# = you can use PVA but it'll pop up whilst drying unless you sit there and pres it back down. I used pva down the centre, and applied superglue to any problem bits.


    It was looking a little bare, so I added doors and some bits and bobs - a spare watchtower beam with chain and hook, a pitchfork & scythe salvaged from the zombies sprue, and I would have liked a weathercock/ barrel/ wheels but I wanted to save the barrell and wheels for another piece (Inn) and the weathercock makes it less easy to store.

    Making the door
    I used strips of 1.5mm for the slats, and 2.5mm for the "z" exterior.
    The hinges were strips of card, punched with a file end and bent over a scalpel back. (could have used more box folds with hindsight). These were superglued onto the door, and then superglued onto the doorframe by the hinges.
    The rope door opener is from the flagellants sprue - there's a bit to go around the neck of one.




    and a farm cat as i felt like it. (The Brettonian dog would do well also)


    I also applied the sand to the base, using a 3:1 ratio of grilled play sand (15kg from argos for about £ 3.0) to citadel basing sand as i wanted a finer finish. While the pva was wet i sprinkled a couple of pinches on the path to the lean to, and the main door as i wasn't going to flock them as much.

    To paint:
    I used Army Painter brown primer spray as i'm lazy - I had to go back to make sure i got the bits between the boards. I avoided using washes as they could have damaged the balsa - I didn't want to risk it.
    I drybrushed with calthan brown and flocked with scorched static grass.
    The metals i did with boltgun metal, washed with black and drybrushed with chainmail.
    The roof slates were painted with chaos black, and had a heavy ish drybrush of the foundarion dark frey, then a lighter drybrush of the foundation light grey.
    I was tempted to try to give it a blue tint but didn't in the end.

    Finished:




    I did this with my WFB fences and came joint 1st in the local GW scenery competition.

    I have been inspired to do more WFB / Mordheim scenery bits using balsa - coming soon...
    (I need to collect either mordheim plastic building bits sprues, or the WFB watchtower spare window bits. I am also going to get bits from the brettonian men at arms / archers, empire cannon/hellblaster volley gun, and giant bits.)

    Last edited by stayscrunchyinmilk; June 3rd, 2009 at 13:05.

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