military vehicle painting vs mini painting - Warhammer 40K Fantasy
 

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  1. #1
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    military vehicle painting vs mini painting

    just a quick question how many here employ military vehicle painting techiniques as opposed to normal miniature techniques?

    I notice a distinct lack of good weathering on most models, and nobody seems to pay much attention to it; but in military vehicle painting they really make it look real, and the entire style just seems like it should be in warhammer, but I dont see it much

    just give your feelings on things like using oils , enamels, airbrushes, and pigments in addition to the normal miniature paints


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  3. #2
    Suffer not the Unclean InquisitorAffe's Avatar
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    /shrug, it's just a different style. Not going to agree one is better or correct. The manufacturers kind of set the tone with the way their studio teams paint the product (and also with the styles that place well in their competitions.) The roots of the form are in a high fantasy style. It's spread to models and miniatures that resemble in some ways conventional military equipment, but remain painted in a manner drawn from the high fantasy style. You can see there are some guys at Forgeworld who have their roots in scale modelling if you look at their studio work, but the stuff that comes out of all the core game company studios is pretty much just high fantasy painted onto whatever shape the model is. Coupled with a system of manufacturer sponsored contests that send the message "this is what the best painted space marine tank in the world should look like," you get a different culture from scale/historical modelling.

    I personally use a lot of oils, especially for red (and weathering of course). Forget doing red in acrylic, bleck. The games manufacturers sticking to acrylic seems to be just sound market strategy to me. They push this crap to children in the mall. I'm careful to lock out my *cats* when using oil, I can't imagine having pots of highly toxic medium and pigment just sitting out open on the table in a mall shop while I'm working. "Oh sorry, did that flying handful of dice splash liquin in your toddler's eye? uhh... here's the number for poison control..... maybe we could pour some turpentine in there to try to rinse it out."

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    it does take a little more of a workshop to manage the oils, thinners airbrush etc; but I definitely think its worth it.

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    Junior Member jammer397's Avatar
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    i think its more about the fact when you do military models its just a few. now with 40k models it takes longer with all the detail and how many your doing at one shot. military model also really arent move around as much as 40k models. most people i have seen do military models do some kind of diorama. to me detail isnt really a big deal. i just want to see a good game grade paint. not just primed or no paint at all. i have seen people have no paint on their minis and i hate that. i wont even let one of my models on a game table without paint of a good base for detail.
    I am an Indestructible master of War.

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    Gentlemen. Hemogoblin's Avatar
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    Luckily for me, My dad has a background in scale modeling. If I ever get around to painting a tank (more for aircraft in historical WWII/modern), I can ask him for help.

    To contribute, I'll agree with Affe, oils can be downright dangerous, especially with the way GW is marketing to kids these days. The vast majority of people either don't paint, commission (not knocking those who do), or just don't have to will to get good. Thus they will never learn the advanced techniques like weathering pigments, oil undertones, glazing, airbrushing, weathering in general, etc. But, fine scale modelers often do, because there in no game for almost every scale, meaning there will be no 'hardcore' gamers who have no interest in painting, so they will always be trying to improve. Another factor is that every model show I've been to (non GW), Realism and weathering is the winning style. With examples such as this, aspiring armor modelers will try to mimic this, thus perpetuating the style among fine scale modelers. By contrast, Gaming modelers see that high-contrast is the way to go through GD and online competitions. They will try to mimic this, look up guides, and perpetuate in among Gaming modelers. The respective modeling styles both have their magazines. Fine scale military has magazines like Fine Scale Modeler, while Gaming has mags like White Dwarf. Looking through an issue of both of these, you'll see that They both have very well painted examples, guides, new release listings, conversion guides, and other cool articles. The thing is, If a store carries mostly one spectrum, it will mostly carry that spectrum's magazines. Exposure to the other side is very limited if you only know about one. The last thing I have to offer is that they are COMPLETELY different cultures. One is all about who makes the most detailed models, who can produce/sell them for cheapest, and who can market them best. The other is about who has the best game to accompany the models.
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