Weathering and Khador Warjacks - Warhammer 40K Fantasy
 

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  1. #1
    Ein
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    Weathering and Khador Warjacks

    I'm looking at picking up Warmachine, and after some deliberation I decided on Khador as my army of choice. They seemed to maintain a bit of the orky playstyle to which I have become accustomed to in Warhammer 40k - advance, smash, advance.

    I didn't really have a specific army list or anything in mind when ordering my first few Khador models - it was basically 'whatever looks cool'. Accordingly, I currently have on-hand a Berserker, a Spriggan, Karchev the Terrible, Man-o-War Kovnik, some Mechaniks, and a Bokur. It's enough to mess around with for now, at least until I become more familiar with the game. I'm holding off on staples like the Juggernaut until I can get my hands on the plastics. More than anything, though, I'm really interested in the Warjacks because they seem like fun models to build and paint, so no matter what, I see myself running jack-heavy.

    So, I figured I'd start mucking about with one of my warjacks. I started with the Berserker because it's the cheapest, both in terms of cost and points, and if I really screwed the model up I wouldn't be too bummed out about it (unlike, say, the $50 Karchev!).

    First order of business was the pose. Something called a 'berserker' shouldn't just be meandering forward like the stock model seems to want to do. I did the best I could to set this thing in motion by converting it's legs into a foward running position. The arms then needed reposing as well, so I hacked away at the upper arm sections to removed them, and replaced them with a simple ball joint system so I could get a rough pose in place.



    reposed the leading leg's foot a bit so it was angled down and looked a bit more like the thing was running forward.

    I've given some thought to lighting the head of this thing, but I probably won't do it, and I'll paint any glow effects on instead. The only way I can really see getting an LED into the visor of the head would be to make a mold of it and cast it in clear resin with the LED embedded inside. Then, I'd paint everything but the visor, and the LED'd shine through there. Seems like a ton of work to do for not much payoff as far as I'm concerned, and I am trying to improve my painting, anyway.

    Anyway, after tinkering about with it a bit more, I'm reasonably happy:









    Got a good bit of forward movement behind him.
    ----------
    I decided to go ahead and start messing around with my Berserker's paint. You may or may not like what you're about to see, it's mostly me experimenting with things.

    I've been trying to refine the hairspray technique over the past few days, and I figured I might as well give it a go on a full model instead of just test pieces. At worst, I can just chuck the model into a jar and scrub it clean and give it another go.

    So, with that in mind, I went about setting up my undercoat of rust and metal. I started by hitting the model with a spray of Krylon Rust-color Primer, and let that sit for a little bit. Then I grabbed my airbrush and Privateer Press's P3 paint color Thornwood Green and hit the model with it in localized areas. Thornwood Green is a very desaturated, dark color that I thought looked like a pretty good contrast to the rust color. I sprayed it focusing mostly around the areas that I knew would be a dark iron or metal - the boiler, the joints, pistons, and the weapons. The goal behind this was to get a bit of variance in the undercoat, so any paint that was uncovered wouldn't all be the same shade of rust orange.






    At this step, I'm fairly happy with the way the thing looks.

    Now, here's where the hairspray method comes in. Just to reiterate what I've posted in the past, the goal of the hairspray method is to create a sort of masking layer that keeps any paint applied over it from sticking completely to the model. It can then be removed with a brush and water.

    I hit the model up with a coat of Testor's Glosscote to help protect this rusty undercoat from the steps to come. Then, once that dried, I gave the model a good spray from head to toe with hairspray, and let THAT dry.

    Once that was done, it was time to apply the base armor color. I wanted my warjacks to be a white color, like a sort of ceramic, so I thinned down some skull white and ran it through the airbrush, coating the model head to toe. I didn't worry too much above the coverage on areas like the boiler or weapons, or the pistons, as I know those are not going to be white by the time the model's done.





    So far so good.I let that dry for about ten minutes while I cleaned out my airbrush.
    ----------
    Now, here's the tricky part. Using a stiff brush and some water, you can stipple the coat that we just airbrushed on. The water on the brush will dissolve the hairspray beneath the paint, and cause the paint to lift and come away as you attack it with the brush. By doing this, I can remove sections of the white paint and reveal the darker coat I first applied.

    In theory, it's a really nice and easy way to weather things. In practice, it's... well, it's easy to go overboard, as you'll see below.






    A problem I encountered as I did this was that the white paint I was attacking with the brush would pool in the recesses of the model, meaning it got washed into the joints in the pistons and what have you. I'm not too particularly worried about that, as I am pretty sure that a bit more time with the brush and some water can get that cleaned up - I'm just taking a break from it for now, as I'm tired of working on it.

    I think the model is also suffering from a bit of a lack of definition. I'm thinking after I work at cleaning the metal areas up (pistons, axes, etc) some more, I'll give the whole thing a thin black wash before continuing, to try and bring the edges back out. Any areas I overdid with the weathering can, of course, be touched up with a brush by hand and some white paint.

    Try and withhold judgment on the weathering until I have a bit more time to clean it up. I know it looks a bit extreme, but I still think I can make it work. If not, it's not a huge loss - a quick bath in simple green'll clean it right up for another try or a different painting method.


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  3. #2
    LO's Resident Time Lord Canew's Avatar
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    Interesting, and I read your linked article. I like the trick you're doing with oil paints. Personally, I've been loathe to do it, as I don't like trying to clean up oil paints, but I can't deny that rust looks fantastic! What did you use for paints to do that?

    One other question: If the hairspray is there to keep the paint from sticking 100 percent to the model, how are you going to make sure when you're finished that the final coats of paint don't chip? Is it enough to just varnish it like normal?
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  4. #3
    Ein
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    The oil weathering (which I haven't done yet to this model) is done with Winsor and Newton oil paints, though I'm sure you can do it with other kinds just as easily. I did do the oil on this piece, though, so you can get an idea of it's effect:

    Before:



    After:



    That was done with small dots of burnt umber and black.

    It'd be great for Nurgle or really beat to hell vehicles, I guess.

    Yeah. Once you're done chipping away at the hairspray layer,you can hit it with a coat of varnish (Dullcote or Glosscote) and it'll lock the paint down and keep it from coming off.
    Last edited by Ein; December 22nd, 2009 at 21:19.

  5. #4
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    oil paint stinks of rotten fish. i smell it day in and day out....... I wish i could go to uni now and mvoe awayf rom it, but a 2 week holiday will suffice for now ^^. Becareful where you store the paint or the other people living their will revolt ^^.
    thanks
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  6. #5
    Ein
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    I've, uh, never really noticed any odor from the oil paints. To be fair, the amounts I use for weathering models are pretty negligible.

  7. #6
    Senior Member micah's Avatar
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    well i really like what you did in assembly.
    your hairspray technique is interesting and i think it will work out well once you refine your method.
    im looking forward to seeing how you finish it and what the end product looks like.
    leave the moderating to the moderators

    if pro is the opposite of con, does that mean progress is the opposite of congress?

  8. #7
    Ein
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    I mucked about with this a bit more, and I'm still unsure how I feel about it.









    The weird thing is, these pictures make it look a little better than I think it looks to the eye, which is the reverse of the way macro photography usually works. I think it's just a bit overwhelming to look at and try to piece together in person.

    I feel like the concept's there, but the execution is lacking. I tried to clean up the pistons and weapons a tiny bit with some boltgun metal and mithril silver, followed by some thin black washes all over the model. I am not sure if I want to keep working on it in it's current state, or chuck it into the paint-strippin' pot for a rematch with different weathering methods. I think part of the problem is my chosen scheme - I really wanted to pull of something like this Spriggan, which I idolize, but I went too far with the hairspray-chipping and made a mess of things.

    What do you guys think? Press on and keep trying to clean the thing up, or toss it to the proverbial lions and strip it for another go?

  9. #8
    Sir Proofreader Deadstar_MRC's Avatar
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    Well, to be completely honest, I'm kind of liking the way this model is progressing. I know I'm judging from the photos, which you've said are actually making the model look better but, while the weathering you've done looks a bit on the heavy side, it doesn't look out of place. Or, at least, it doesn't to my eyes...

    I'm all in favour of you persevering (spelling?) with this, seeing how it turns out. Just my take on things, though!

    EDIT: Oh, I should have mentioned I quite like the reworked pose, too! Suitably Bezerky, I think!
    Last edited by Deadstar_MRC; December 23rd, 2009 at 05:19.
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  10. #9
    Senior Member micah's Avatar
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    i think it looks alot better and i think youll get there if you stick with it.
    try filling in more details, maybe more colors.
    just keep going
    never give up, never give in!


    in the future maybe you should fully paint the model with all the colors and detail you want and then isolate the weathering to certain parts.
    i think doing the entire model the way you did is maybe one reason you went overboard and feel a little overwhelmed.
    leave the moderating to the moderators

    if pro is the opposite of con, does that mean progress is the opposite of congress?

  11. #10
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    I have used this color scheme and technique for my Khador jacks:

    http://blog.brushthralls.com/?page_id=3719
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