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  1. #1
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    Novice questions

    Currently working on my new eldar army and wanting to achieve something better than table-top quality. I have done a lot of reading and am excited about trying some new techniques. However I seem to be missing something fundamental. I prime black with a can, even coat, not heavy ect.. then base in dark angels green. But the green covers the black, how do I keep the paint of the recesses I want ot stay black (I am thinning the green) Or should the base coat not be thinned? Or should I paint the whole area a solid color and wash later to get darker recesses? I have done a lot of research, but I think this is so basic that it's not mentioned in any of the tutorials.


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    If i understand correctly what it is that you're after, then the best way is to paint all the green areas solid green, then use a darker green wash to get into the recesses. If you really want to do things properly, you should thin down your paint for the base coat as well. It may take a few more layers to get a solid colour, but by using thinned paint, you avoid brush strokes. If you want to get really technical, start with your base coat of thinned down green, and once you have a solid colour, add a little lighter green, and paint the main areas of the model, avoiding the placers that are supposed to be darker (recesses, joins in armor etc.), then, lighten your paint and repeat, leaving a little of the previous colour showing. It can take a while to do this method, but if you're aiming for something above tabletop quality, you cant go wrong. There are plenty of tutorials on shading in the forums.

    (Edit: this is just the method I use, I'm not necessarily saying this is the way it should be done).

    - Rahz

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    Senior Member MarxusTharin's Avatar
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    The way you keep the paint out of the recesses is to not paint the recesses.. If the paint is flowing into the recesses, you have thinned the paint too much and have actually created a wash.

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    The paint should be thin enough more than one or two coats are needed to coat black but not so thin it will go everywhere. If you're leaking into recesses you don't want it you've thinned it too much.

    The paint needs to be CONTROLLED to be any good to you, practice will eventually achieve the ideal consistancy for different situations. Only practice, no real wuick tips here, just something to work on.
    Fantasy: Wood Elves, Dark Elves, Beastmen and Tomb Kings.
    40k: Tyranids
    LotR: Misty Mountains and Rohan

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