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  1. #1
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    New guy painting.

    Hi guys, im completly new to the painting and was wondering about thinning my paints. ive read that washing up liquid is a good substitute for the more expensive things.

    But my main question is, for a good effect and finished look is thinning vital?

    Ive just bought an imperial gaurd bloodhound and wanted to paint it a kind of sandy colour. I would like to see some pics of a thinned out painted miniture through the progressive stages to the end, ive looked for some paiting techniques and help and ive ended up here.

    Any help or web sites with the above info would be appreciated, thanks.


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    Senior Member Frankendoodle65's Avatar
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    most decent paintjobs on the net use thinned down paint, so you can see examples everywhere. the thing about thinning paint is, it makes the model look a thousand times better than if you use paint straight from the pot, because it will be very thick if you use it straight from the pot, so it may clog up detail and ruin smooth surfaces, whereas thinned paint will create a nice, smooth effect.
    yes, washing up liquid is fine, but you only add a tiny bit to the paint/water solution. i'll tell you the formula i used to use for most things...

    10 parts paint, 10 parts water, and 1 part washing up liquid

    now i use 20 parts paint, 18 parts water, 2 parts winsor and newton acrylic flow enhancer and 1 part acrylic retarder.

    this works so much better than the origonal mixture, it flows better, it stays wet for longer, so won't dry on your brush, and it's so much easier to paint small details.
    if you are reading this signature, then you are wasting you're time, and i am wasting my time by writing it, so run along now, jimmy, run along.

  4. #3
    Thread Killer! slorak's Avatar
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    First off welcome to the Forums!

    It is vital to thin your paints before painting. There are two main reasons as well as others as to why you should do this:

    1)Paint that is not thinned tends to show brush strokes.
    2)Paint that is not thinned tends to obscure details on the figures

    You will also find that if the paint is unevenly applied that it will look "lumpy" as well.

    As for thinning the paint itself - you can always fall back on thinning it with water. I think you were probably talking about adding a drop of dish soap. This reportedly will cut the surface tension in the water. I use a mixture of a few things. I have a dropper container that is 50% water, 30% Future floor wax (to cut surface tension), and 20% liquitex extender (slows drying time and makes wet blending easier).

    Hope this is a good primer for you [No pun intended! ]

    Please don't hesitate to ask questions as being new to the hobby I am sure you will have plenty!

    Cheers,

    -Mike

    Now offering an affordable Tournament Legal Quality Commission pricing. Find out more here!

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    I actually have only started thinning my paints recently and i know now that I should have started a lot sooner. I still do a fairly amateur job. When I get the paint new, open the lid fill the paint with water and add a drop of washing up liquid. Close the lid and give a shake..........thinned paint quickly.

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    Thread Killer! slorak's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by chemicalcaveman
    I actually have only started thinning my paints recently and i know now that I should have started a lot sooner. I still do a fairly amateur job. When I get the paint new, open the lid fill the paint with water and add a drop of washing up liquid. Close the lid and give a shake..........thinned paint quickly.
    In the interest of keeping the integrity of the paint I would advise against this. The best method would still be to add the thinner after you put the paint on your pallete. Some things that I can see you running into would be - adding too much water to the paint and now the whole pot is dilluted. Using the thinned paint and after some time the water starts to evaporate leaving an uneven amount of pigment vs. dillution to the paint. Etc.

    Cheers,

    -Mike

    Now offering an affordable Tournament Legal Quality Commission pricing. Find out more here!

  7. #6
    Senior Member Senigar's Avatar
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    It took me awhile to catch on that thinning paint even with water helps alot. Makes it look less blotchy.

    If you need to know best ways to thin, theres a sticky right in this forum about it.

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    Member Sebastian's Avatar
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    Senior Member gundamfan's Avatar
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    i thin my paints with water. Just remember, like almost everything else these days, thin is in! Not only does it look much better, but it's easier to paint as well. It runs smoothly over the model. If you don't thin your paint, it will show, and look very lumpy, and you will have comments about it if you post a pic of models painted with unthinned paint. Really there's nothing to lose when you thin paint.

    Just remember:
    1)If the paint doesn't really flow on your palette well, it's too thick.
    2)If you put some paint on the side of a palette well and it runs down, then it's just right.
    3)If you see the paint sorta retracting on a plastic palette, it's too thin, and you'll need a million layers to get it right.

    It's all a matter of getting the right consistency. Good luck!

  10. #9
    Ayatollah Moomintroll Hard A**'s Avatar
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    Its a myth that you can achieve a good result with just one coat of paint.

    Depending on how expert a paint job you want :
    • Prepare the mini, and degrease it with a dilute detergent rinse, allow to dry.
    • Do not touch the primed surface with your fingers again, use the base or a temporary painting handle to support it as you apply paint.
    • Prime using a spray primer - use Citadels for convenience, or a car/hobby primer for a little cost saving. White or grey is best for practically all purposes. Black primer will make your models look dull and lifeless.
    • Use a Stay-Wet palette, which allows you to mix and blend your paints, and allows the mixed paints to stay wet for litrally days. This also saves paint as you only have the paint pot open for the amount of time required to put some on your palette, so the pot is not open long enough for any significant evaporation.
    • Mix your paints using a little acrylic flow improver, such as Liquitex or Windsor and Newton. These can be bought from Art Shops and Hobby stores.
    • Use a little acrylic retarder as well, to stop them drying too quickly.
    • Use clean water or even a Citadel Ink to dilute the paint. The correct 'sloppiness' of the paint will come with experiance.
    • Get a decent light to paint by, preferably from two sources. The main light should come from top left, however.
    • Rest both your hands on a stable surface such as a table top as you apply paint to the model This radically improves your hands steadiness, and speeds your painting as you will make far fewer mistakes.
    • Rinse your brushes regularly. Incidentally, Citadel brushes are fine, and will last for years if you treat them right. Most of my brushes are over five years old.
    • You should aim at using two or three coats of Acrylic to get a decent deep colour. This is how acrylic paints are designed to work by the way, ask any paint technician.
    I hope this helps.
    Ryan Dancey, Vice President of Wizards of the Coast, believed that TSR failed because of "...a near total inability to listen to its customers, hear what they were saying, and make changes to make those customers happy." Are you listening, Games Workshop ?

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