Realistic environmental effects sourcing? - Warhammer 40K Fantasy
 

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  1. #1
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    Realistic environmental effects sourcing?

    Has anyone noticed that when doing basing materials (ie. leaves, snow, grass, etc.) it's always left exclusively to the base of the model? If there is any wind at all, then it should not only be on the ground, right? For example, snow models always just have snow on the ground, but snow is sourced from the sky - shouldn't it fall on the shoulders of the model, etc. as well? Shouldn't leaves get caught in clothing, etc?

    Not sure how to express this thought. Does anyone know what I mean, or is it just not possible / too much work?


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  3. #2
    Lurking in the dark CryoGenFX's Avatar
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    aye, snow falling from the top is a good idea, as is snow drifting, the lower part of the legs for instance, as snow is very light and have a tendency to blow across the ground, clinging to boots and pants. But as for leaves on clothes...well, Ursarkar Creed has a cigar, and should have smoke coming out of it, but like the leaves, it's just a bit too realistic. some things are better left off, lest the model look overloaded in details.

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    Son of LO The_Giant_Mantis's Avatar
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    The trouble is.. a lot of models are.

    1) Wearing smooth armour, which snow won't adhere too well.

    2) In active poses.. snow doesn't gather if something is moving.

    I think drybrushing some white onto the lower sections of exposed cloth (i.e. robes.. to suggest they've been dragging in the snow etc) would look cool, any more would make the model look static.

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    Lurking in the dark CryoGenFX's Avatar
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    well, staticness can also work in certain cases. Picture a company of guardsmen. having served in the army, I know excactly what this can mean sometimes, sitting around for days, just waiting for orders, waiting for supplies or just waiting for the enemy to come to you. I think guardsmen are a fairly static force, and just sitting in the snow while the heavy weapons do their jobs can be quite fitting for these unfortunate souls. And even if you are moving about, snow is always going to cling to you, as clothes get wet after beeing exposed to snow for a while, and snow sticks to wet clothes like superglue
    Now, I'm not saying you'd look like Frosty after 10 minutes, but snowy areas will definately appear.

  6. #5
    Librarian from Hell Andusciassus's Avatar
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    Snow would be easy enough on tanks and alike, but on individuals it could look like they've just been standing around.
    Mud and dust is other things though that you see on quite a few models, and in my opinon it relly adds to the quality.

  7. #6
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    I like your train of thought. For wargaming figures it is too much trouble and would look odd if your army was given the weather or terrain treatment and the opposition was on desert (or builders) sand. However, for showcase painting I think realism should extend as far as makes sense aesthetically. By all means, think like a two-dimensional painter so long as you maintain a sense of proportion.

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