Highliting - Warhammer 40K Fantasy
 

Welcome to Librarium Online!

Join our community of 80,000+ members and take part in the number one resource for Warhammer and Warhammer 40K discussion!

Registering gives you full access to take part in discussions, upload pictures, contact other members and search everything!


Register Now!

User Tag List

Closed Thread
Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 25

Thread: Highliting

  1. #1
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Location
    Connecticut
    Posts
    12
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Reputation
    1 (x1)

    As you guys prolly know by now, im not the best painter, so i would love to hear some tips on how exactly to highlights my minis, thanks.


  2. Remove Advertisements
    Librarium-Online.com
    Advertisements
     

  3. #2
    7th
    7th is offline
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Location
    Manchester, UK
    Posts
    17
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Reputation
    1 (x1)

    Erm, everyone will have their own opinion on this.. everyone also developes their own methods, so there's no "right or wrong" way to go about it, i'll tell you how i do highlighting.. hopefully some more people will tell you how they do it and after a few posts you can get a rough idea of various techniques to adapt for yourself *shrug*

    for models like space marines, where the entirety of the model is going to be one colour AND it is armoured all over you can get away with the following technique i find...

    basically, i start with a far darker colour than i want the piece to end up, for example, if i was painting an ultramarine i would start with a very dark blue... once the very dark blue was applied, i would pick out all the armour plates in ultramarines blue, after that, a ultramarines blue / skull white mix to pick out the edgs of armour would be more than enough for "rank and file" troops, you could take this along a few more levels for characters etc.

    for fur / armour / areas with a texture...

    simply paint the area a light colour (for chainmail armour, use mithril silver for example), give it a wash of a suitable colour (using the chainmail example, use black wash), once the wash has dried, drybrush it with mithril silver!

    for anything that isnt textured or covered head to toe in armour, i tend to try blending the highlights in without using a wash of ink, for example. a cloak, i would start with a very dark base colour and then mix in a lighter shade of the same colour, several times, to build up the highlights on the cloak

    hope this helps a little, and apologies for the disjointed nattering... i cant think straight right now (or type either it seems)

    7th

  4. #3
    Senior Member XV-88's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    In a fool's corner.
    Posts
    878
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Reputation
    1 (x2)

    Originally posted by 7th@Nov 23 2003, 08:47
    basically, i start with a far darker colour than i want the piece to end up, for example, if i was painting an ultramarine i would start with a very dark blue... once the very dark blue was applied, i would pick out all the armour plates in ultramarines blue, after that, a ultramarines blue / skull white mix to pick out the edgs of armour would be more than enough for "rank and file" troops, you could take this along a few more levels for characters etc.
    I would follow this advice, but instead of starting with a dark color, just start with Ultramarine, then line highlight with a mix of Ultramarine and White (Mostly Ultramarine, though.).

    Line Highlighting: Get the color you want on the figure, then mix some of that color and white to get a lighter version. Get that on the side of your brush, and go along the edges of armor, etc. to make them look a little rugged or worn.
    Henceforth no man shall set foot upon the world, and all around shall be set sentinals to ward away unwary spacecraft. We must accept that this place is lost to us forever, and is now the eternal habitation of abomination.

    <div class='quotetop'>QUOTE</div><div class='quotemain'>another annoying thing i hate: 47,000 similies in one post. just thoght id throw that in there and see if anybody else hates it as much as i do.</div>

  5. #4
    Senior Member logan grimmnar's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    london
    Posts
    841
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Reputation
    1 (x2)

    i do my 13th company mainly with codex grey but with fortress grey highlight..the colours looks sexy

  6. #5
    Senior Member Gray Wolf's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Location
    Northern California
    Posts
    453
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Reputation
    1 (x1)

    I usually pick out a darker color than what I want the piece to end up.
    I base coat my Space Wolf marine in "Shadow grey" as the darker color. Now that the figure is covered in the base color, I can now apply the next color of "Space Wolves grey", which will also be used for highlighing.

    Now highlighing is just lighting the high points of the figure, such as the top of the head, shoulders and the tops of the arms. This is done with drybrushing with "Space Wolves grey".

    before I begin to drybrush my highlights in, I will need to thin out the paint to a milky-like consistency. I normally thin them out to 1 part paint, to 3 parts water, however I have found reading WolfRaiders method, more efficient. You can find that article here.

    With my paint thinned, I can now start drybrushing.
    I load up the brush with a small amout of paint (only to the tip), then wipe the exsess paint off on a paper towel. No paint should be readily visible. Test it on your hand to make sure.

    I now scrube the paint onto the figure. Remeber, there is vary little paint on the brush, so I can be a little more aggressive (Do not worry if you do not notice any change, you will beging to see the highlighing after several coats have been applyed). It is when the next highligh, that I begin to soften my scrubbing. Adding "skull white" to "Space Wolves grey" will be next and last highligh color. half of each color are mixed togeather and then thinned. This will be used to highligh the vary edges and overhangs of the figure. This requiers vary light drybrushing and will make all the difference. This is vary much the same as above, but in smaller proportions, both in brush, paint and in drybrushing.

    Wish I had a digital camera.
    If Wolves were meant to fly, wouldn’t the Emperor have given them wings?


  7. #6
    LO Zealot WolfRaider's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    New Mexico
    Age
    53
    Posts
    1,659
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Reputation
    22 (x4)

    I&#39;ll try to summarize the whole highlighting/shading thing as short as I can. In reality there are so many techniques you could write an entire book on the subject. You just have to keep researching, trying, and practicing. You will get better, but no matter how good you get, there will always be something new to learn and someone better.

    First off, no matter what anyone tells you, painting is an art, not a science. Pick and choose what you like, practice, relax, and enjoy yourself. Take advice only if you feel right about it. All advice is just someone’s opinion. Never take anyone’s word for anything. Try out a new technique a few times, see if it works for you, then adopt, adapt, or throw away.

    Shading, Washing, Gazing, Drybrushing, Highlighting and Edging
    These are techniques to give a little realism to your miniatures. Miniatures are so small that light does not give them the proper perspective. To make them appear more realistic, painting techniques are used to exaggerate shadows and highlights. Shading and highlighting give the illusion that there is light shining upon the figure. Shading details the folds and shadows and highlighting picks out the brighter, better lit areas. Washing, glazing, outlining (black lining) and blending are all methods of shading. Drybrushing is a highlighting technique. It is simply accentuating the high spots with a bit of paint a bit lighter than the base. The difference between highlighting and drybrushing is only the method in which the paint is applied to the model. Glazing is usually done with inks, but inks can also be used for washing and outlining.

    Outlining is simply picking out the line between two separate parts of the miniature such as joints in the armor or borders between pieces of clothing. Its often called black lining because it involves painting or inking in a fine line of either black or a darkened shade of the base in order to bring out the division between the two sections. Using ink thinned with alcohol is probably the easiest way to black line.

    Blending is an advanced technique and takes a fair amount of practice. Blending is smoothing the transition from one color to the next so there is no defined line of color change. To blend, shades of paint are carefully thinned and blended into the surrounding areas using a damp brush. This is not a technique for beginners only for the reason it is difficult to master. But that does not mean a beginner should not try it. The only way to get better, and master, blending is to do it. I recommend practicing on metal miniatures since they are easiest to strip. You will find blending easier if you use a retarder mixed in the paint. It will slow the drying time and allow you to blend the paints together. One technique that may help is using a palette to mix the range of paint. Place a drop of each color separate from each other on the pallet. Add the retarder and mix the colors by drawing the drops together in the middle. Keep the far ends pure, while the middle is a 50/50 mix. Now you have a full spectrum of paint in a line across the pallet. Another method is to paint multiple bands of paint on the model. As each band is added, it is blended with the edge of the previous, still wet, band of paint. The hardest part, especially with acrylics is keeping the paint from drying before you blend the two bands.

    Washes
    Washing comes before drybrushing. Use a shade of paint darker than your base color and dilute it until it&#39;s about the consistency of milk. Now, brush it across, the entire surface you wish to shade, allowing it to flow most heavily into the recesses. Remember, you can always add wash, so start light and work your way up. Don&#39;t be afraid to apply several washes until you&#39;ve reached the effect you like. You may have to wash different areas separately so you can hold the miniature at an angle that will let the wash set where you want it. If you keep the miniature upright, the was will flow to the bottom of everything. If that’s where you want it, it’s good. Otherwise you have to hold the miniature so the wash flows into the areas you want.

    Thinning Paint
    As I mentioned above, you have to thin the paint to create a wash. You will also have to thin your paint for just about every application, just not as much as when creating washes. Thinning is very important, and will have a great impact on the quality of the paint. You have two choices for thinning, the inexpensive, and the slightly more expensive. After trying both, I feel it is well worth the cost to use professional thinners, and isn’t that expensive when you loot at the whole picture. First the cheap way; add one drop of liquid soap to you paint pot and thin with water. As a slightly better thinner, you can use one part Future Floor wax (clear acrylic liquid wax) to three parts water, and use this instead of plain water. So what’s wrong with the cheap way? Acrylics aren’t pain mixed with water. The clear part of acrylic paint is a medium designed to adhere to a surface and dry with a hard shell. The more water you add, the weaker this medium becomes. Water also has a high surface tension which causes the paint to bead up if too much is added. So on to the best way. In any store that carries a selection of acrylic paints, you can find Flow Enhancer, Acrylic (airbrush) Thinner, and a variety of mediums to produce special effects; pearl, gloss, crackle, etc. Make a mix of flow enhancer and thinner. You can add a little water, but you don’t need to if you use acrylic airbrush thinner, which is very thin. I also like to add retarder to the mix to slow the drying of the paint. This gives the paint a chance to flow and eliminate brush strokes. This mix will make you paints very smooth and flow extremely well. I use an empty dropper bottle; add concentrated flow enhancer (10 drops per oz), retarder (10 drops per oz) and the rest is four parts thinner to one part water. I use this to thin all my paints.

    Why do my washes dry badly?
    It seems that once in a while, even though the inks and washes have been mixed properly, they end up drying, not in the low spots like they should, but on the high contours. It has something to do with the density of the wash and the slickness of the surface; on matte surface the effect is more prominent than on glossy surfaces. It happens because a pool of wash in a recess starts to dry from the edges, then the rest of the paint in the wash adheres to the already dry paint, producing a ring of paint around the recess. There are four methods that can help solve the problem:

    1) Add a small amount of rubbing alcohol to the wash. It lowers the surface tension, and dries faster. This may be a drawback for some painters. Some model railroaders have been doing this for a while now. Whenever I use inks to black line, or I want to keep the ink very dark but still flow.

    2) Add a drop dishwashing liquid soap to the wash. It helps the wash stick better. You probably won’t have this problem if you mix with professional thinners and use a flow enhancer.

    3) Use small amounts of wash, allowing each to dry before applying the next. Blow gently on the wash after applying, from the top, to keep the pools in the recesses where they belong. If the wash is thin enough, it&#39;ll dry with a minimum of blowing.

    4) Mix a new wash, thicker. It might work better, being thick enough to keep from creeping, or maybe with just little different density.

    Drybrushing
    Click for a larger article on DRYBRUSHING

    How to highlight
    Drybrushing is the easiest method of highlighting any area with pronounced of deep detail, such as fur, hair, and chain mail. With caution and practice it can be used on smoother areas such as faces, hands, buckles and the like. Unlike drybrushing, highlighting is actually painting the areas you want to brighten. To highlight you need a fine brush point and a steady hand. Try bracing your elbows on the table, and, with one hand holding the miniature and the other holding the brush, use a couple of fingers to touch your two hands together. I usually hold the mini with two or three fingers and the others touch my painting hand. It’s hard to describe, but try out a few positions. So, back to highlighting. It’s done by taking a slightly lighter shade of the base and painting the raised areas lightly. Start with a shade only slightly lighter than the base, and paint 90% of the raised area. Then lighten the shade some more and paint about 50% of the area, only on the higher portions of the raised area. Finally, using the lightest shade of the base color, paint about 10% (the highest portion) of the raised area. Depending on your skill and patience, you can use one or more applications of highlight colors. What I just described is a three-layer highlight. When lightening the paint, try not to use white. Use a lighter color of the base color instead. It will look much better. You can add a little white for the final highlight color.

    For faces, highlight the chin, nose, and cheeks. For hands go along the backs and each finger. For other detail, robes, armor, skulls, and equipment, pick the spots that should show up best and give them the lightest highlights. It&#39;s common to highlight twice, each time getting lighter in tone and finer in line. A bit of blending is required to keep things looking natural, but this blending is easier than the large-surface technique. Simply keep a damp brush handy and brush very lightly toward the darker areas. Again, this technique takes practice, but is worth the effort when the miniature is completed.

    Inks
    Inks are semi-transparent, very intense tones that can be used to add color and shading to a miniature. If you wish to go beyond the range of paints, you might wish to try working with them. Unless using for outlining, inks should always be thinned slightly for glazing and a lot for washing. About a 50-50 ink and thinner mix is best for glazing. If you go to the art supply store to buy your inks, you can get a variety of inks beyond what GW offers. Make sure to get permanent inks

    Glazing is most often done with inks. Glazing differs from washing in that part of the intended effect from glazing is to alter the color of the entire surface in addition to darkening the recesses. Washes are designed to flow off the high points and concentrate in the recesses. Glazes color the high points as well, just not to the extent of the recesses. Most often glazes are used to smooth out the changes in a blended or highlighted area. With this technique, a slightly darker tone than the base is thinned and brushed over the entire surface and allowed to dry. Glazing brings out a richness of color not possible with paint alone. It can also produce new colors, such as creating a metallic purple by glazing purple ink over a silver painted surface. The glaze lets the base color show through the ink tinting. Glazing should be done after highlighting and shading and tends to bring up detail of these well.


    Hmm, wordy but still not enough information. Needs pictures too. I&#39;ll expand on this and add an article to my site this week.

  8. #7
    Senior Member FlatFeet's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Location
    Auckland, New Zealand
    Age
    28
    Posts
    447
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Reputation
    1 (x1)

    How do you highlight boltgun metal? It already looks shaded and highlighted enough :blink:

    W/D/L

    Dwarfs 1/0/0 (Reset due to new rules)

    Space Marines 0/0/0 (still under construction)

  9. #8
    Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    Stockholm, Sweden
    Posts
    71
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Reputation
    1 (x1)

    How do you highlight boltgun metal? It already looks shaded and highlighted enough
    This is how I paint boltgun metal

    I always use black undercoat on all models. If you use white undercoat I suggest you paint your entire metal areas black to get a better base colour to start with.

    I then continue with a layer with bolt gun metal(BM). I apply a wash of a thinned out mix of black and blue ink. After this you get a quite dark metallic look on what you are painting. Its now that I start highlighting. First I go over the part with BM again, I suggest you study pictures of where to apply the brighter paint. Highlighting is all about where you apply paint and where you don’t, it’s as simple as that. After the second layer of BM I mix up a lighter tone with mithril silver and after that I add the final highlight of mithril silver only. At this point I’m quite satisfied if I’m painting for TT-quality.

    hope that helps

    V.

  10. #9
    Senior Member FlatFeet's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Location
    Auckland, New Zealand
    Age
    28
    Posts
    447
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Reputation
    1 (x1)

    Wow. Thanks

    W/D/L

    Dwarfs 1/0/0 (Reset due to new rules)

    Space Marines 0/0/0 (still under construction)

  11. #10
    Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    172
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Reputation
    1 (x1)

    Thanks I needed that advice aswell is there an easy way to get paint off plastic I need to know

Closed Thread
Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts