Testor's Enamel? - Warhammer 40K Fantasy
 

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  1. #1
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    Hey everyone, I'm new here.

    I've been painting models for...about a year. I've always used Testor's Enamel paints though. I keep hearing how much better it is to use water-based paints..and I've made this thread to ask how true this is? Should I really switch?

    I used to make Gundam models, but grew tired of them...They are too big and always seem to take nasty shelf dives. Right now i'm working on WWII Figures and thinking about getting a few warhammers.

    Can someone list Pro's and Con's with using oth Enamel and water based?

    Painting models is my hobby during the winter.
    Peace.


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  3. #2
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    I started with Testor's Enamels way back in the day, as well. I swtiched over to acrylics pretty readily, and haven't looked back since. It's been a while, so I don't remember all the details, but some advantages of water-based include:

    1) You don't need a specialized caustic fluid to clean your brushes with.
    2) Acrylics tend to dry much more quickly, which means models get finished faster
    3) *YMMV* I was never able to make an effective wash or drybrush using the enamels. Seemed like every time I got the wash down to the right consistency, the turpentine'd strip the previous layer of paint right off the fig.

    The big advantage of enamels, imho, is that the metallic colors are absolutely wonderful. Citadel's metallics come close, but even they don't match up to the metallic paint that comes out of a Testor's bottle.

  4. #3
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    Alright thanks.

    And yeah, I'd have to agree with you on that one - The metalics are really nice. Couldn't you just use Testor's Metalic paints while using acrylics on the rest?

    What are the price differences? Are there any? What is the best kind of acrylic paint to use for minature models such as army men, and warhammer?

    Could it be true that Enemals are better for larger models?

    Thanks again.

  5. #4
    Senior Member Gray Wolf's Avatar
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    I admit, I was a Testors addict. That was before I used Reaper Pro paint. after using Testors for so long, the transition to acrylics was so much easier. Paints did not need to be thinned down so much, brushes lasted longer and were simple to clean, paints smelled far better and are non-toxic.

    bottom line, acrylics are so much simpler. It dose not mean they are better, but try telling your girl friend why the house smells like, paint thinner.
    If Wolves were meant to fly, wouldn’t the Emperor have given them wings?


  6. #5
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    Haha, I see where your coming from...good point. I don't care about that though. In my room I have newspapers everywhere and a nice setup for where I paint.

    I'm still wondering about price difference.
    Is Reaper Pro a good suggested paint?

  7. #6
    Senior Member Gray Wolf's Avatar
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    Quality paint comes at a price. your looking at paying anywere between $2.00 to $3.00 for a 0.4 oz pot of paint. And Reaper Pro is not the only quality brand out there. Vallejo and Citadel are also premium paints, with Vallejo paint being the best and most expensive on the market.

    However there is a cheaper way. for .44 cents you could get a 2. oz bottal of acrylic paint in the art and crafts section, at Wal-Mart. Look for paints like "Apple Barrel" or "folk Art". They are not the quality brands, but with a little practice, it will make no diffirence. I have seen people do beautiful jobs with this paint.

    Just make sure to thin it down really well.
    If Wolves were meant to fly, wouldn’t the Emperor have given them wings?


  8. #7
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    Alright, thanks Gray Wolf.

    I have SOME experience when it comes to painting models, but not a whole lot. I don't think I've experimented enough with thinning paints..So i'm not too sure how thin to make it.

    When I have some time, or complete new models I'll be sure to post some pics on the board.

  9. #8
    Senior Member Gray Wolf's Avatar
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    Just add water when using acrylics. Simple as that.
    I typically guess with the water combination. I start with 50/50 water to paint, then add water depending on the job the paint will be achieving. A good example would be a wash, which is just extremely thinned out paint to darken the low spots.
    I start with 50/50 just as above, then I continue to add water until it becomes translucent, but yet still has color.

    There are other methids of thinning down paint, such as Acrylic flow enhancer and retarder , which can be found at craft stors. They do the job just as nicely.
    If Wolves were meant to fly, wouldn’t the Emperor have given them wings?


  10. #9
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    Testors makes great Acryls too. So does PolyScale and Tamiya. All great paints.
    When I first got into this hobby of WH40K, I hated the Citadel paint, but then the more I Used them, the more I found that for figure painting they are fine. Just add water as recommended by the others. ALSO, rubbing alcohol works great! Thing is your work time is decreased as it evaporates faster than water, but goes on much smoother!!! You should try it. For vehicles I ONLY airbrush. I only use the three paints listed at the start in my Airbrush. If you would like to see a few models that I used the airbrush on with the 3 main paint brands, check out these links....

    http://gallery.librarium-online.com/Imperi...ards/aaj?full=1

    http://gallery.librarium-online.com/Imperi...ards/aak?full=1

  11. #10
    Member Ajax's Avatar
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    http://www.track-link.net/gallery/755

    Here is a model painted that is NOT WH40K....

    PS: If you can afford one, and airbrush is the only way to paint vehicles! Or atleast spraypaint for the base colors...

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