Lessening the Contrast between 2 colours - Warhammer 40K Fantasy
 

Welcome to Librarium Online!

Join our community of 80,000+ members and take part in the number one resource for Warhammer and Warhammer 40K discussion!

Registering gives you full access to take part in discussions, upload pictures, contact other members and search everything!


Register Now!

User Tag List

+ Reply to Thread
Results 1 to 5 of 5
  1. #1
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Posts
    13
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Reputation
    1 (x1)

    Lessening the Contrast between 2 colours

    Hi, my question is how to lessen the contrast between a base colour and some detailing painted on top of it.

    For example, lets say I use a deep red base coat, and paint some sort of detailing on top; tiger stripes, spots, camo patterns, etc., with orange or a lighter shade of red. After drying, I find that the two colours are actually too far apart, the too sudden contrast producing a splotchy feel. How can I lessen the contrast, "blend" the two colours closer together?

    Will inks or washes or glazes do the job? I don't really understand what washes and glazes do. I have read the descriptions, both on this page and others, describing HOW to do it, but the effects are still a mystery to me. I will eventually try these effects on paper to see what happens, but would like some suggestions first. Thanks in advance


  2. Remove Advertisements
    Librarium-Online.com
    Advertisements
     

  3. #2
    Thread Killer! slorak's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Long Beach, CA
    Age
    43
    Posts
    2,642
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    ReputationReputationReputationReputationReputationReputationReputationReputationReputationReputationReputation
    425 (x8)

    Glazing will help bring the two colors closer together. However another approach would be to do a series of consecutive shade mixes where you gradually add more and more of a lighter shade and paint up to the lightest color. This technique is called layering. Takes a big longer to do but looks quite a bit better.

    Cheers,

    -Mike

    Now offering an affordable Tournament Legal Quality Commission pricing. Find out more here!

  4. #3
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    285
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Reputation
    0 (x0)

    you can outline the stripes with black or white. of you're doing a camo pattern just paint it like real camo, just red. Red, stripes of orange, red, black, white, grey whatever.

  5. #4
    The Fallen Cheredanine's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    SW England
    Age
    48
    Posts
    7,745
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    ReputationReputationReputationReputationReputationReputationReputationReputationReputationReputationReputation
    411 (x8)

    as slorak said, thin glases of ink will soften the transition, but the conventional way of doing it is to layer or dry blend, this can be suplemented with an ink wash
    Everything you have been told is a lie!


  6. #5
    Senior Member Tygra's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Wales/N.Ireland,UK
    Age
    25
    Posts
    402
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Reputation
    9 (x1)

    The advice above is great, a glaze should do wonders, however if you have twoo colours it may be difficult to use a glaze apprpriate to both so i would go with layering.

    There is a thread somewhere that I have read that gives the differences between the effects of a wash inking and glazing somewhere,ill try to find it.
    Think this is good? Rep me and click the star
    <<<<

    "You dont start learning until you're stuck or acknowledge your mistakes"

+ Reply to Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts