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  1. #1
    Senior Member Jhagadurn's Avatar
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    -31 (x0)

    How to paint kroot?

    Howdy guys,
    I'm building a big fat kroot army, and without wet blending every single kroot infantry, I don't really know how to paint them well.....

    I want them to kind of be green with a toffee colored belly and brown leather stuff.... so I have an olive color (non GW) for my green and a toffe color for my bellies.... But that was plain, and so I went to try to add detail, by washing them, and I didn't like either the flesh wash, half flesh half water wash, or the brown wash....

    Any another suggestions? Should I try this dipping thing? What about highlights after washing? I need help! :x <--(sick kroot)

    TSg.t Zakarius Clay
    142nd Cadian, Stationed Planet Skyfall B
    4th Brigade, 1st Battalion, 1st Co.
    'The Pathfinders', Drop Team - 6


    Pssst.... give me kudos....

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  3. #2
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    695 (x8)

    choose your colours (you've done this already) mix some darker shades into them to make them darker, apply this darker colour as your basecoat. Then paint varying degrees of lighter shades on top building up a reasonable highlight. Highlights are placed on areas that would naturally catch the light, not nesserary around every edge.

    When using this layering approach getting the colours to blend instead of band can be quite tricky, lets say your blending the colours of the rainbow, instinctively you'll want to paint each stripe from end to end but you'll suffer from banding if you do this. If you paint each stripe with vertical strokes and feather each stroke slightly over the previous layer the blend will be far softer. Watering your paints so they're opaque softens the blend even more.

  4. #3
    Senior Member Jhagadurn's Avatar
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    -31 (x0)

    I said without blending....... I have 90+ kroot to do.... that would take like a month.
    know any other ways?
    TSg.t Zakarius Clay
    142nd Cadian, Stationed Planet Skyfall B
    4th Brigade, 1st Battalion, 1st Co.
    'The Pathfinders', Drop Team - 6


    Pssst.... give me kudos....

  5. #4
    Senior Member Astantia's Avatar
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    48 (x2)

    If you want it to look good, that's where you're at. Those huge model counts usually suffer in the quality department.


    I say do a couple squads in show quality, and do the rest for tabletop, or you're going to have to work alot. Remember, what takes a month now, after some practice may be able to be accomplished within a week. All it takes is practice and repetition.

    Good luck.

  6. #5
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    695 (x8)

    Dry brush highlights

    Ink shadows

    Dipping

    Paint just flat colours.


    Those are pretty mush your only options.

  7. #6
    Ayatollah Moomintroll Hard A**'s Avatar
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    293 (x5)

    Get an airbrush and basecoat them. Then choose a 'darker' colour and spray them from 'above' as if they were standing up. Or lighter. This gives them a sophisticated and very three-dimensional look, and is immensely quick.

    Also with Kroot, you can use a 'mottled' skin effect, get an old toothbrush and 'flick' paint 'freckles' onto the base-coated Kroot.

    Last edited by Hard A**; July 4th, 2006 at 05:48.
    Ryan Dancey, Vice President of Wizards of the Coast, believed that TSR failed because of "...a near total inability to listen to its customers, hear what they were saying, and make changes to make those customers happy." Are you listening, Games Workshop ?

  8. #7
    Thread Killer! slorak's Avatar
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    425 (x8)

    Quote Originally Posted by Gareth
    Watering your paints so they're opaque softens the blend even more.
    I think you meant transparent :shifty:

    As for quality of your finished product - That really depends on what you are aiming for. Would you rather have nicer looking figures in the long run or table top figures now? A good compromise might be to paint to the best of your abilities and do a squad at a time. Mix the finished ones with unpainted ones until you finish?

    As for ways to speed up painting without significant loss to quality. Look for a spray equivalent to your base color. This way you can spray the entire model with the base color. If you have the money you could always invest in an airbrush so you could mix your standard colors and spray the base color. Barring this you can use a larger tank sized brush and using very watered down paint - do your base color. This should be fast and with the paints thin shouldn't cause you to loose details.

    Inks can quickly give you shadow. For highlights if you pick - say 2 colors that work with the base color and aren't too much brighter you can quickly add highlights. for example lets take reds: you could base in the darkest red, do a brown ink wash, highlight with the medium red, and final highlights with the brightest red. The reds will blend together better because they are in the same family and if you keep your paints thin when applying the color below will bleed through to make it appear smoother.

    Then you can go back and pick out details on the figure at this point.

    It is a general good idea to think about your color scheme ahead of time. Paint a test figure or 4 and see what works and what doesn't. Between the figures see what steps don't really add much and see what happens when you eliminate them. Unfortunately it is a trial and error procedure. I would also consider basing the figure before you prime and paint them (during the assembly stage) as it will look more like it is supposed to be there rather than an after thought.

    cheers,

    -Mike

    Now offering an affordable Tournament Legal Quality Commission pricing. Find out more here!

  9. #8
    Ayatollah Moomintroll Hard A**'s Avatar
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    293 (x5)

    There is a problem with using GW inks as they currently are. It's to do with how they dry on the model. Basically, you would expect and hope that inks would leave a darkening 'patch' in the recessed area of a mini, so that the intensity of the ink colour deepens (darkens usually) as you get closer to the deepest recess of the errmm...recess. It would be great if this was a smooth gradation, but the way the standard ink dries does not always produce this. This is because of surface tension (and often dirty/dusty minis or mixing water) that makes for irregular and 'broken up' shades - as the periphery of the damp puddle dries, it pulls some of the collected pigment out towards the edge of the dry area, and it gets messy and looks dusty.

    There is a way around this. Use a water-tension breaker (preferably a proper 'artists' one, but you could also try a tiny amount of washing up detergent if pushed). Also, get a gel-type retarder for best results (once again, a trip to the art-shop, and these products are designed for use with acrylic paints. GW paints are acrylic of course, and mix well with several artistic mediums and solutions for various effects).

    Add some clean (preferably distilled) water, and a little amount of pigment. What you SHOULD end up with is a kind of mildly slippery, slightly coloured gel-based slime. If you brush this over a mini, it will collect (while still wet) in depth in the deeper recesses of the mini and will dry in a controlled manner, allowing the 'pigment' to stay in the recesses. In short, it’s rather like the famous dipping process, except rather more controlled. Its still pretty quick once you set it up and mix the 'slime'.

    Last edited by Hard A**; July 3rd, 2006 at 21:50.
    Ryan Dancey, Vice President of Wizards of the Coast, believed that TSR failed because of "...a near total inability to listen to its customers, hear what they were saying, and make changes to make those customers happy." Are you listening, Games Workshop ?

  10. #9
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    695 (x8)

    ok if we're going to picky the exact word i require is translucent.

    I'll stick to painting rather then English language.

  11. #10
    Monkey of Mystery The Paint Monkey's Avatar
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    743 (x8)

    I painted all the kroot in my gallery (http://www.librarium-online.com/gall...mageuser=11569 ) by spraying them black, heavily dry-brushing with a dark green and then a lighter drybrush of another lighter green (scorpion, maybe?). The beaks were painted shadow grey. I then painted the belly's with, if I remember rightly, a mix of camo green and bleached bone. The whole figure was then given a wash of watered down Dark Angels green. This smoothed the dry brushing and gave the belly and beak a similar hue to the rest- making it look quite natural (I reckon). Then it was just a matter of picking out the spines, equipment and other detail. The 'hair' was painted black and then a light drybrush of regal blue. The overall scheme doesn't sound too different from what you're proposing (it just depends on the toffee flavour).
    That whole squad took maybe 8-10 hours? Not too bad if you want to paint a whole army. Big (I mean 3/4 inch across) drybrush brushes are your friend. If you're painting an eye, you use a tiny 'eye-sized' brush. If you're painting a whole figure use a figure sized brush.
    Last edited by The Paint Monkey; July 4th, 2006 at 13:43.
    No more NG spearmen, thanks! Now I need some pump-wagons!

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