A Paint in the neck! - Warhammer 40K Fantasy
 

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  1. #1
    Senior Member Sartorious's Avatar
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    A Paint in the neck!

    Okay, this will probably get a lot of groans, but i have two questions that no one I know that does this can answer to my satisfaction, so here goes:
    1.) I have no luck keeping paint brushes in good condition for even a short time. By the end of the second day, no matter how carefully i clean them (or how often I clean them) instead of coming to a nice sharp point, the brush has began to form a hook at the top.
    I have tried different types of brushes besides just the Citadel over priced ones but with no luck. The only thing that i can think is to go with Windsor Newton, which is awfully expensive but of course would be a savings when I consider how much I shell out for cheap, throw away brushes.
    2.) Am I the only person to have a hard time distinquishing some of the detail? I know that I am looking through 'old eyes', but even with good lighting and a magnifying visor there are times when I can't tell if the lump behind the rifle that the soldier is holding against his chest is part of the weapon, a pouch of some sort, or just a clump of uniform. Under the weapon, by the trigger, there again is that a frigging pouch, part of a clip, maybe, or is this a guardsman just glad to see me?
    I just know that by writing this I am really asking for it, but what the hell?
    Thanks!


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  3. #2
    Thread Killer! slorak's Avatar
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    I think I have an answer for both of your questions:

    1) Usually you get fishhooks on synthetic brushes. For most of your paint work I would recommend sable brushes - more specifically Kolinsky Sable will hold up better. Cleaning your brushes is paramount from keeping paint from drying on the brush. One think to help keep a good point is this:

    Between paint sessions take a damp brush and brush it across a bar of brush soap and then roll the bristles on a paper towel until you get a nice point. The brush soap will help hold the point. Kinda like training your brush I guess.

    As for seeing the details - here is what I do and it seems to work very good. I prime all (well almost all) of my figures white and then take watered down black ink and tint the models. The black ink should sink into the recesses and distinguish all the little bits. Just make sure you dillute the ink enough and don't let it overly pool up on the figures.

    Cheers,

    -Mike

    Now offering an affordable Tournament Legal Quality Commission pricing. Find out more here!

  4. #3
    I'm Back! Koss's Avatar
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    Lick your brush... No I'm serious, Lick your brush.

    In between painting something, wash the paint off your brush and then put the brisle end in your mouth. Then use your tongue and saliva to form it back into a point. sometimes you have to suckle it a bit to get it back to the point. I've been doing this as long as i remeber and it works really well.

    Yes, it may be unsanitary.
    Yes, from time to time you will consume a bit of paint; but dont worry most paints(GW at least) is non toxic. Plus, I kind of like the taste of paint.
    That is not dead which may eternal lie,
    for in strange aeons even death may die.

  5. #4
    Second Company Apothecary SentryKiller's Avatar
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    Kossolax, you scare me. :rofl:

    I bought a small bottle of "pink soap" brush cleaner from the local craft store, and it also recommends to use a drop to condition the brush between uses. Slorak's suggestion of brush soap (bar) would do the same. It helps my GW brushes to last longer, and keep their points.
    Quote Originally Posted by Montford981
    How can an entire army of intolerant, homicidal female pyromaniacs not be fun?

  6. #5
    I'm Back! Koss's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by SentryKiller View Post
    Kossolax, you scare me. :rofl:
    Lol, I'm putting that in my sig...
    That is not dead which may eternal lie,
    for in strange aeons even death may die.

  7. #6
    I Expect the Inquisition RecklessFable's Avatar
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    I have to admit, I've started to lick my brushes as well. Not the same effect as licking frogs, but more productive...

    I don't know what models you are using, but I've found that some of my old metals just don't HAVE the defined details I want for painting things like faces...
    RecklessFable's Journey to Mediocrity (Painting an IG army)
    I've been addicted to World of Tanks lately and neglecting my IG... But it is so... much... fun!

  8. #7
    Senior Member Legionnaire's Avatar
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    Try to use separate brushes for intensive jobs as well, such as a separate drybrushing brush, and a separate undercoating brush. Both these techniques can shorten the lifespan of your brush dramatically, so its best to spread it out over a few. Remember when cleaning your brush, that although cleaning it well is important, if you scrape it along the bottom of the cup, or violently smash the bristles on the sides, the negative impact on the brush is outweighing the positive impact of cleaning it well. Little things like keeping the brush upright when you are not using it, and not leaving it in the water downwards are also important.

    I HIGHLY recommend reading this entire guide: http://www.coolminiornot.com/article/aid/35

    Hope this helps
    ~Legionnaire
    "In dedicato imperatum ultra articulo mortis"

  9. #8
    The Shadow Knows! Jon Quixote's Avatar
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    Also, when washing brushes, don't rub them against the side of the water pot, but rather rinse them in the pot with a swishing motion. And also, don't over load the brush with paint, this helps when it comes to washing, and stops the paint clagging in the ferrule.

    I leave those tip covers on the brushes I'm not using so that the brushes don't get damaged in storage.

    I hope this helps.


    EDIT: Pah, I just read what Legionnaire said ^.
    Cervantes: In order to attain the impossible, one must attempt the absurd.


  10. #9
    Librarian from Hell Andusciassus's Avatar
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    The bending can also be due to not using enough water while painting. It's important not to use paint straight from the pot, but to dillute it a bit before applying. This makes the work ,for the brush and for you, so much easier. This way the bristles will be moving around a light watery substance instead of some cloggy old paint.
    Let the water do the work for you.
    Also make sure you don't get paint in the base of the brush, where the bristles meet the handle, this paint will be very hard to get rid of and once dry it will make the bristles want to move apart from each other. Making a plume.

    Also make sure you use old brushes, like the one you mentioned, for Drybrushing, never use a new brush. That'll eat brushes like if there's no tomorrow.

  11. #10
    Ayatollah Moomintroll Hard A**'s Avatar
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    The fact that you mention the tips of the hairs are 'bending around' suggests to me that you are physically applying the paint to the model wrongly. The ONLY way brush hairs can bend is because they are being bent during use. It is NOT like they are naturally bent, and overuse somehow causes their natural bend to come back.

    You must NEVER 'push' paint onto a model with the tip of the brush. Always slide the paint on with the side of the tip of the brush.

    If you look after your brushes they should last for about three or four years. Mine do.

    Other essential tips: ALWAYS use water with GW paints, the chemicals in acrylic paints NEED water to work properly. NEVER use a good brush to mix paint or transfer paint from the pot to the palette surface.

    Get a Stay-Wet palette. If you want to paint well, it's the only way.



    Ryan Dancey, Vice President of Wizards of the Coast, believed that TSR failed because of "...a near total inability to listen to its customers, hear what they were saying, and make changes to make those customers happy." Are you listening, Games Workshop ?

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