Forge World Hierophant - Warhammer 40K Fantasy
 

Welcome to Librarium Online!

Join our community of 80,000+ members and take part in the number one resource for Warhammer and Warhammer 40K discussion!

Registering gives you full access to take part in discussions, upload pictures, contact other members and search everything!


Register Now!

User Tag List

+ Reply to Thread
Results 1 to 6 of 6
  1. #1
    Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Posts
    25
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Reputation
    4 (x1)

    Forge World Hierophant

    (Originally posted in modelling, but have gotten only one response)

    So I arrive back home from work in Uganda yesterday to find my new project waiting for me patiently. A Hierophant Bio Titan and what a lot of work it is going to require. So I figured I would ask for some advice.

    First off, I'm curious about what size base I should use for it. I know the model does not require a base and will probally not use the base for gameplay, I want a base for modelling/display purposes though. I think anything this large deserves to be shown off in a nice scene (which I have planned out quite nicely). The second part of this would be where to find good bases for models.

    I've read from various sources and have tested the flexibility of the Hierophants legs, particularly towards the thin blade like ends. While on the base I don't believe this will be a problem due to how it will be modelled. Anything this big and heavy will naturally sink into the ground quite some distance and it will be modelled appropriately for that. But when removed from the base for gameplay I don't want to have to worry about the legs breaking and do not wish to cut the legs off to make them stronger. Any tricks to help support something like this? Maybe a epoxy like glue that can be put on the legs to help strengthen/stiffen them up once it's dried? Obviously I don't want the legs to look like they are encased in ice or anything but is there a way to stiffen them without adding too much material to the legs themselves? I suppose the simplest solution for this may be to simply make individual bases for each leg that attach further up where it is stronger.

    I believe that is all I have questions about for now.


  2. Remove Advertisements
    Librarium-Online.com
    Advertisements
     

  3. #2
    Blood Boy Leech's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    Northern Ireland
    Age
    37
    Posts
    3,643
    Mentioned
    2 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Reputation
    ReputationReputation
    795 (x8)

    I've been working on a Hierophant for a while and it is a long-term project but it's very cool. The big problem with it is the legs. You can try to heat them up with a blow dryer until they are flexible. Then bend them slightly. The front legs are best bent slightly inwards so they don't stick out to the side quite so much. The rear legs you can bend them inwards too a bit, bend them at the lower part of the legs. This will make it easier to put the model onto some sort of base. If you want it stuck on a base permanently then you should put pins in the tips of it's feet.

    You can possibly to try to make a scenic base for it. This can allow you to possibly have something on the base that touches the lower areas of the Hierophant. These things can be used to pin the Hierophant onto the base and make it more secure in it's grip. Pin the legs and arms to the model and expect to use green stuff to fill in gaps. I'm not sure what to use as a base. Perspex could be used. Ask more if you want specific info. Also ask Gareth about his, he did a good job on his Hierophant, though he chopped up the legs which I don't like.

  4. #3
    Blood Boy Leech's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    Northern Ireland
    Age
    37
    Posts
    3,643
    Mentioned
    2 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Reputation
    ReputationReputation
    795 (x8)

    Sorry, double posted.
    Last edited by Leech; April 19th, 2010 at 00:09. Reason: Double post.

  5. #4
    Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Posts
    25
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Reputation
    4 (x1)

    There will be quite a scene going on under my Hierophant so I'm not sure I mind the wide stance so much. There will be things to support the legs as it will be modelled with the legs sinking into the ground. (Anything this large that walks on four knives, will sink into the ground) But I won't be actually cutting the legs off at all, the base will be thicker in areas where the legs are (small hills, rocks, rhinos, etc.) in contact with the base. These objects should give extra support to the legs high enough for the bladed tips to not be taking the weight of the body.

    The problem with a huge, solid base however is, gameplay. Actually fitting the model -anywhere- on the board. The Hierophant should be able to walk over most terrain and I want to try to model it that way for gameplay as well. Having a big solid base under the Hierophant just won't work out that well. Which means making the Hierophant removeable from the base. I'm just going to have to figure out the easiest way to make that possible.

  6. #5
    Blood Boy Leech's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    Northern Ireland
    Age
    37
    Posts
    3,643
    Mentioned
    2 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Reputation
    ReputationReputation
    795 (x8)

    One thing to accept about the Hierophant is that it is a lovely looking model but nobody gave the slightest thought to it's design, (what gave them the idea it could work that way is beyond me) that's why it's so hard to make a base for it and use it at the same time. You could try to make four holes in the base which the tips of the legs fit into. That will make it removable from the base when you need it.

    You could try what some have done which is to stick a big metal pole into it's abdomen as a support. I've also seen the one in the Apocalypse book has this and it uses a base that is much smaller than the width of it's legs. That may help you to use it for gameplay. Make sure you also have the legs going far enough forward so that it balances properly, it is very prone to falling forward on it's face. I suggest you do a test before you glue it to get an idea of how wide a stance it really has with it's legs, you may find there is too much space, even for your scenic base.
    Last edited by Leech; April 19th, 2010 at 22:02.

  7. #6
    Senior Member TamCoan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Age
    45
    Posts
    815
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    ReputationReputationReputationReputationReputationReputation
    156 (x3)

    I've seen one build where each leg and joint had a metal rod put through it for support. Allot of work drilling, fitting and testing but it added a ton of structure to it. Still I think additional support rods would make it more secure. That's a large chunk of change to see fall to the ground because a fragile leg couldn't take the weight.

+ Reply to Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts