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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
First time using it, got a couple questions.

1: how long should i wait before starting the undercoat and painting process after i'm designed and made my convertion.
2: how hard does green stuff get(hard as pewter? more? less?)

i'd hate to drop my IG commander on his head and have a permenant dent in his hood because it doesn't get that hard. Either way knowledge is power, so gimme all your power!
 

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Borderlands addict
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971 Posts
GW Online : News : Convershun Klinic : Working With Green Stuff That should answer drying times. Once it's dry you can undercoat and paint it as you wish.

As for hardness, it should certainly be hard enough to withstand a drop. If you apply pressure with, let's say, a fingernail, it would leave a mark. It's definitely not as hard as pewter as you can cut in to it (maybe) as easily as plastic.
Hope that helps! :happy:
 

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Librarian from Hell
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4,133 Posts
Welcome to tthe wondeful world of GreenStuff sculpting.
It's a tricky little medium to get the hang of but once you've trained a bit it'll be another level of the miniaturehobby. As for your questions:

1, it really only needs to be hard enough to paint, so say 10 hours depending on a few things such as how you've mixed the blue and yellow, temperature, and such. It'll take a bit longer for it to cure completely though so I'd recommend a good 24 hours.


2 In big chunks such as heads and bodies it'll be hard, in smaller details such as arms and fingers it'll be a bit soft (like...wobbly? ) for ever. If you make details thet will carry their own weight such as swords and such you should look for another medium like plasticard or maybe some milliput.
But as in your question, it won't dent like metal, it's having a completely different structure chemically.

Read up on the tutorials that are on almost every forum and get practicing.
Keep your tools wet and your patience big.
 

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Borderlands addict
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971 Posts
OK, I agree with Andusciassus and leave it 24 hours to dry. There is too many influencing factors it's annoying. Andu's a god with greenstuff so anything he says can be taken as sound advice 8Y

If you can, pictures of what you're doing and trying out are always useful as they allow us to give better comments, advice, praise etc :) All the best!

:happy:
 

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Sir Proofreader
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4,251 Posts
I remember checking this a while back - as far as I recall, more or less quoting from the packet, greenstuff has a working time of 2-3 hours, and an ultimate curing time of 24 hours.

So, should be soft enough to mould with for about 3 hours, and should be completely ready to paint in 24.

That said, I've painted over greenstuff which hadn't been left for 24 hours with no noticeable problems.

Course, other more or less pointed this out above. But I want a share of the credit! :ninja3::ninja:
 

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LO's Resident Time Lord
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3,270 Posts
Don't forget Brown stuff. It works similar to green stuff, but is much more "solid" when dry, I'm told. Many people claim it's much easier to cut or sand when it's dry, and is great for sculpts that you want to have edges to.
 
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