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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
This one hasn't made the forums yet I don't think. Anyways, GW has a new CEO. Likely to do with some of their business failings in recent years, especially Lord of the Rings.

PRESS ANNOUNCEMENT

For immediate release 3 December 2007
APPOINTMENT OF CHIEF EXECUTIVE

The Board of Games Workshop Group PLC (‘Games Workshop’ or the ‘Company’) is pleased to announce the appointment of Mark Wells to the Board as Chief Executive of the Company with immediate effect.

Mark joined Games Workshop in 2000 from Boots plc and has been Head of Sales at the Company since 2006.

Tom Kirby, who has been Chairman and Chief Executive of Games Workshop since 2000, will continue as Chairman of the Company.

Tom Kirby said: ‘Mark has the vision, ability and passion to lead Games Workshop in its next phase of growth. He not only understands Games Workshop’s business model and its special culture and spirit, but he is a strong advocate of the values that are so important to the Company.

‘Mark and I share the same vision for Games Workshop, and we have ambitious plans for growth and value creation. I trust Mark absolutely to do the right thing for the Company, our shareholders and our staff.’

No additional information should be disclosed under paragraph 9.6.13 of the Listing Rules of the UK Listing Authority.

…Ends…

Enquiries:

Games Workshop Group PLC
Tom Kirby 0115 900 4001

Rawlings Financial PR Limited
John Rawlings 01756 770376

Landsbanki Securities
Shaun Dobson 0207 4269000

Notes to Editors:

Mark Wells Biography

Mark Wells, age 45, MA Law, St Johns College, Cambridge [Exhibition], MBA Stirling University. Qualified as a solicitor with Messrs Herbert Smith. Next plc: Retail, Mail Order, Buying and M&A. Various management roles with Boots plc, including Director of Customer Service, Boots The Chemists and Director of Merchandise and Marketing, Boots Stores, Netherlands. Games Workshop General Manager UK Sales and Hobby Division CEO.
 

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Sparta!
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I know it's a bit old, but it's still good to see that rampant capitalism is still around.

"...I trust Mark absolutely to do the right thing for the Company, our shareholders and our staff."

He could have at least mentioned the millions of customers who spend a bucket load of money on their products.
 

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Thread Killer!
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I know it's a bit old, but it's still good to see that rampant capitalism is still around.

"...I trust Mark absolutely to do the right thing for the Company, our shareholders and our staff."

He could have at least mentioned the millions of customers who spend a bucket load of money on their products.
Should it be any other way? Oh my a business interested in making money... Who would have thought??? The outrage! :p;?

In all seriousness and to address the issue of not thanking the millions of bucket toting customers... they usually don't do that sort of thing in press releases... For some reason I got a really silly image in my head of a GW store on fire and customers trying to put it out by throwing bucket fulls of money on it... ;o;?

Sorry. I must be in a silly mood for sure! Have a great evening!

Yarr!

-Mike:drinking:
 

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Sparta!
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Should it be any other way? Oh my a business interested in making money... Who would have thought??? The outrage! :p;?

In all seriousness and to address the issue of not thanking the millions of bucket toting customers... they usually don't do that sort of thing in press releases... For some reason I got a really silly image in my head of a GW store on fire and customers trying to put it out by throwing bucket fulls of money on it... ;o;?

Sorry. I must be in a silly mood for sure! Have a great evening!

Yarr!

-Mike:drinking:
Quite frankly, yes it should be another way. I have nothing against business trying to make (more) money don't get me wrong, it's just that it has become apparent in the last few years that that is all they have been interested in and it is taking it too far.
I don't know what things are like in america but here in Australia it is common for a business to acknowledge the support of their customer base and at least pretend to pledge continual support - it's common courtesy at the very least.
There is a point in succesdul business when, after you have built up excellent customer rapport and service, that it starts turning rather profitable. GW have reached this but the misake that many make is they become singularly focused on the bottom line and lose the support base and interaction they had with their customers that got them this far. So in their desire to make more and more money and sell more and more products they alienate and offend many of their long-term customers and this proves rather detrimental, as I fear GW is now finding out.
 

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Exarch Thomo said:
I don't know what things are like in america but here in Australia it is common for a business to acknowledge the support of their customer base and at least pretend to pledge continual support
Games Workshop is based in the UK, I believe.

-Nik
 

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Painting Machine!
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Games Workshop is based in the UK, I believe.

-Nik
"If the whole world moved to their favorite vacation spots then the whole world would live in Hawaii, Italy and Cleveland."

Businesses everywhere have to, surprisingly, make money, both to stay afloat and if they have them, to satisfy shareholders. Otherwise, we could have a GW that is out of business, or worse, in the lawn and garden business. A profitable, healthy GW is far more important to me than one that panders to me in press releases.

Tekore
 

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Aliens ate my soul.
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I don’t know why everyone thinks G.W is the only evil corporation.
I work for the biggest brewery in the world, and I just spent the
last two hours in a meeting reviewing 2007 figures. They are not
too health at all, so now there is a big drive on increasing our market share,
cutting costs, and increasing volume sold. But not once were our customers
mentioned and the impact it might have on them. We will increase our prices,
reduce costs, and generally sell beer to just about anyone. Why? so the company
can see a bigger profit next year and the managers wont lose next years bonus.

A profitable, healthy GW is far more important to me than one that panders to me in press releases.
I total agree with this, after all the press release is aimed at share holders not 16 year old hobbyist, anyone who believes otherwise has no clear grasp on what a company is there for.
G.W is a wargaming company which leads its market, but it’s one in a large number of companies that compete for attention in a leisure market which is starting to suffer. Economic pressure and fears of global slow down and a possible recession have meant that most people are starting to tighten their spending.
The credit crunch is making harder for people to borrow and also makes people aware about how much debt they are really in already.
G.W and the brewery I work for are taking long hard looks at themselves and will
be doing everything they can to increase growth and profitability.
On the other hand this is good news for most of us; G.W is starting to produce some amazing quality work, and will be looking to other areas for further growth.

I think we can relax and look forward to many more years of
G.W as the main hobby/wargaming company. But I would not expect any price drops so don’t hold your breath for that,infact I would expect even more price increases this year or early next year. As oil and energy prices rise, this will have a knock affect in the price of miniatures, the cost of road/air transportation, retail overheads.

 

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Kut Maar Krachtig
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I know it's a bit old, but it's still good to see that rampant capitalism is still around.

"...I trust Mark absolutely to do the right thing for the Company, our shareholders and our staff."

He could have at least mentioned the millions of customers who spend a bucket load of money on their products.
LOL, you are so right. This is examplory of how GW thinks.
 

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Quite frankly, yes it should be another way. I have nothing against business trying to make (more) money don't get me wrong, it's just that it has become apparent in the last few years that that is all they have been interested in and it is taking it too far.
I don't know what things are like in america but here in Australia it is common for a business to acknowledge the support of their customer base and at least pretend to pledge continual support - it's common courtesy at the very least.
There is a point in succesdul business when, after you have built up excellent customer rapport and service, that it starts turning rather profitable. GW have reached this but the misake that many make is they become singularly focused on the bottom line and lose the support base and interaction they had with their customers that got them this far. So in their desire to make more and more money and sell more and more products they alienate and offend many of their long-term customers and this proves rather detrimental, as I fear GW is now finding out.
I find it funny that the biggest complaing most people have against GW is that they want to make money. How do you start a sentence saying you don't have a problem with GW making (more) money and then finish it up with... but that is all they are interested in?

Your second paragraph really doesn't make any sense. You spout out a bunch of alarmist theories with nothing to back it up - it also has nothing really to do with their announcement of a CEO change. In my opinion GW still listens to their consumer base - I would even go so far as to say much more so than any other time. They are continually asking for feedback via the web, their publication and even to some extent from the stores themselves on things that the consumer would like to see, how to better a product, etc. Games Days are an excellent venue for this. I have attended numerous seminars at GD's where key designers were asking what people thought of their work. They do listen.

Bottom line with the "money" issue. Since I am guessing you don't have a background in business or economics I am going out on a limb thinking that perhaps you can't afford what you want from GW? That tends to be a huge reason (and actually quite understandable) why a lot of people complain about the prices... Personally people who don't have the money to buy everything they want need to sit down and evaluate what is affordable. It is possible to get a playable force for less than $300. Throw in maybe $100 worth of supplies and you are set. The problem is people tend to buy multiple armies, grow bored and want something else, buy yet another army, and then complain about prices...


LOL, you are so right. This is examplory of how GW thinks.
Do you work for GW? Are you a member of the board? How do you know that this is how GW thinks? I would love to hear your argument for this statement. Please share.

Cheers,

-Mike
 

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LO's Resident Time Lord
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Quite frankly, yes it should be another way. I have nothing against business trying to make (more) money don't get me wrong, it's just that it has become apparent in the last few years that that is all they have been interested in and it is taking it too far.
I don't know what things are like in america but here in Australia it is common for a business to acknowledge the support of their customer base and at least pretend to pledge continual support - it's common courtesy at the very least.
There is a point in succesdul business when, after you have built up excellent customer rapport and service, that it starts turning rather profitable. GW have reached this but the misake that many make is they become singularly focused on the bottom line and lose the support base and interaction they had with their customers that got them this far. So in their desire to make more and more money and sell more and more products they alienate and offend many of their long-term customers and this proves rather detrimental, as I fear GW is now finding out.
I agree with you in principle, but I have to side with Slorak on this one. Yes, corporations should remember and thank their customers for their loyalty and patronage, but as a journalist going on 10 years experience in mainstream and business press newspapers and magazines, I can tell you I've seen hundreds, if not thousands of releases just like this one, and they never acknowledge their customers. The reason is simple: The customers are not the intended audience of the release. Most of these releases get published by the business press, if they're published at all. Unless the average WHFB/40K player reads the Wall Street Journal, Harvard Business Review, etc., I doubt said players (ergo, GW's customers) will ever see it unless it's put up in a forum like this one. No, it will be read by shareholders, corporate execs, etc., and thus it's tailored to the audience most likely to see it. In other words, it's a well-written press release.

Now, if Mark Wells did, say, an interview with Jervis Johnson in WD, well, that's a TOTALLY different ballgame, and he'd BETTER acknowledge the aforementioned bucket-carriers.

Until then...
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
To reiterate the above posts a little, this is a company press release. A CEO's job is to grow the company. It's not "rampent capitalism." Slorak took care of the rest.

Now on to something productive with this, I dont' have an MBA, but here are my personal thoughts for GW to improve as a company.


Topic 1: Alignment with the modern Global Supply Chain
While GW has expanded their markets, they have in my opinion missed the boat on how mondern gaming vendors operate. Online and freelance vendors have releaized rather than having to deal GWs (what I consider stupid) stocking practices (having to keep $10k worth of gear in the store, etc.), have begun selling their stuff online at 10,15, on up to 25% off the regular price. From what I can tell, these vendors take a hit finacially because they don't mark up GW goods as high, but they sell way more volume to guys like you and me, or to small stores who can't/won't follow GW's ridiculous stocking practices. In the end, this hurts GW sales because they have less of their goods on display (an important part of their "advertising"), or they're being undercut by these frelance vendors who buy from them in bulk and sell it cheaply.

I feel like GW also has baglogging issues with model manufacturing. A lot of modern companies have developed "just in time" business strategdies (see Amazon, Walmart, Dell) that GW in my opinion has failed to impliment. While there's some difficult with this given the nature of the hobby, GW can do what hundreds of others have done and develop less wasteful systems.

Topic 2: Word of Mouth/Vendors
I think in the last few years GW thought they make their own stores into their primary income base. Problem is that there isn't a wide enough interest in just one or two games to keep a store afloat, hence they close as many stores as they open. Magic, regular board games, etc. are where most stores make their business. GW needs to realize this and re-align their stocking and marking to piggy-back off that like they used to. People don't just walk in and pick up 40k, they start on something smaller and then see it and go for the big one.

In addition, online business could allow GW to totally customize their product to fit the needs of the vendor. Again, rather than a flat "this is how you will sell GW" policy, they need to do what everyone else has done and allow totally customizable sales and stocking practices.

Topic 3: Mid/small size game ranges
This is where GW has failed the most. All their smaller hobbies have tanked: Lord of the Rings, Battlefleet Gothic (yes it was good, didn't make them as much money as you think), necromunda, etc. I think this is from failure to properly manage a market these systems. Personally, I think GW should aquisition a smaller company who's good at this, give them copyright access, and them leave them alone to do their magic. The entrenched business practices in place right now just aren't condusive to making a good small gaming system.

It's important GW gets back into this market too because games like Warmachine and Hoards are growing in popularity.

Topic 4: White Dwarf vs. The Interweb
White Dwarf has no practical use anymore. It's an advertising magizine. GW's website cataloges all the articles we need, and if I want to look at pretty models, this site alone has plenty. GW needs to totally reasses white dwarf as a concept. My thought would be to make it an E-zine, and maybe give subscribers back-access to old white dwarfs, rules systems, etc. Save them and us money.

Conclusion:
GW has the advantage of being a large company to totally take advantage of modern global supply chaining. They just simply haven't. My feeling is that they still think its the mid-90's and Warhammer is some underground word of mouth thing. Well, it isn't. They need a better business model and supply system so they can push more volume when the economy is good and demand is high, and then cut it back when the economy is low and demand is low.

Note: Pricing of models are another issue altogether. This is about how to run the company, not necessarily how improve customer satisfaction.
 

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Thread Killer!
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To reiterate the above posts a little, this is a company press release. A CEO's job is to grow the company. It's not "rampent capitalism." Slorak took care of the rest.

Now on to something productive with this, I dont' have an MBA, but here are my personal thoughts for GW to improve as a company.
You have some very well thought out comments here. I too don't have an MBA either... My jab was at simple inflammatory statements with nothing to back them up.


Topic 1: Alignment with the modern Global Supply Chain
While GW has expanded their markets, they have in my opinion missed the boat on how mondern gaming vendors operate. Online and freelance vendors have releaized rather than having to deal GWs (what I consider stupid) stocking practices (having to keep $10k worth of gear in the store, etc.), have begun selling their stuff online at 10,15, on up to 25% off the regular price. From what I can tell, these vendors take a hit finacially because they don't mark up GW goods as high, but they sell way more volume to guys like you and me, or to small stores who can't/won't follow GW's ridiculous stocking practices. In the end, this hurts GW sales because they have less of their goods on display (an important part of their "advertising"), or they're being undercut by these frelance vendors who buy from them in bulk and sell it cheaply.

I feel like GW also has baglogging issues with model manufacturing. A lot of modern companies have developed "just in time" business strategdies (see Amazon, Walmart, Dell) that GW in my opinion has failed to impliment. While there's some difficult with this given the nature of the hobby, GW can do what hundreds of others have done and develop less wasteful systems.
I won't pretend to have an answer for this though I have an idea why GW wants a certain dollar amount purchased by independent retailers. By selling in an independent retailer they are staking their reputation of product on the retailer. By requiring such a high dollar stock they are helping make sure that their lines are fleshed out and available. The high dollar amount also helps curb the discounts (to some extent) and make sure that GW hits thier profit numbers...

While I don't agree with GW's policy of not allowing displayed web sales of their products at a discount I can understand their business philosophy behind it. They lack control of the market that way and it directly hurts their own instore and online presence.



Topic 2: Word of Mouth/Vendors
I think in the last few years GW thought they make their own stores into their primary income base. Problem is that there isn't a wide enough interest in just one or two games to keep a store afloat, hence they close as many stores as they open. Magic, regular board games, etc. are where most stores make their business. GW needs to realize this and re-align their stocking and marking to piggy-back off that like they used to. People don't just walk in and pick up 40k, they start on something smaller and then see it and go for the big one.

In addition, online business could allow GW to totally customize their product to fit the needs of the vendor. Again, rather than a flat "this is how you will sell GW" policy, they need to do what everyone else has done and allow totally customizable sales and stocking practices.
Retail space wise they simply don't have the space to put the smaller less popular games on display. On the web all of the Gothic, Mordheim, bloodbowl, etc. is readily available. The store front is what gives GW their unique stance. While they might not all be "profitable" I personally find it and interesting form of marketing. What other game company basically gives full support for their product at a store? They will do everything from get the product for you, give you space to build and paint it, and a place to play. If you need rules help they will offer it. It is a pretty unique thing and I would hate to see it disappear.

Also please note that I live fairly close to a battle bunker but don't go there regularly and don't play very often. I mainly paint. I just like the idea of the store and its functionality to their advertising and support.

I think we are starting to see change in the way they do business. Especially online. With the new bitz re-organizing they are streamlining and cutting costs in how they used to work their online orders. Not necessarily a good thing overall but they are definitely not stagnating in a "90's business environment" whatever that means. I am sure they work dillegently on seeking out new ways to keep their product expectation and support in place while trying to reduce costs... it is the nature of business. Ultimately you usually lose some good things.

Topic 3: Mid/small size game ranges
This is where GW has failed the most. All their smaller hobbies have tanked: Lord of the Rings, Battlefleet Gothic (yes it was good, didn't make them as much money as you think), necromunda, etc. I think this is from failure to properly manage a market these systems. Personally, I think GW should aquisition a smaller company who's good at this, give them copyright access, and them leave them alone to do their magic. The entrenched business practices in place right now just aren't condusive to making a good small gaming system.

It's important GW gets back into this market too because games like Warmachine and Hoards are growing in popularity.
In a niche hobby to begin with you can't expect their smaller games to outsell and outperform their big ones... Thier smaller games are a niche to a niche hobby. I love bloodbowl and know people who enjoy it - but I know more than enjoy 40k more that don't play bloodbowl.

From a business perspective why invest money in something that will not perform to their expectations. It doesn't make sense. Now they still do support it to a point with their online presence so it is still accessible to some point. Would I like them to emphasize the smaller games more? sure! It just isn't all that likely. They do periodically visit some of their older stuff and make new models. Just isn't regular.

Topic 4: White Dwarf vs. The Interweb
White Dwarf has no practical use anymore. It's an advertising magizine. GW's website cataloges all the articles we need, and if I want to look at pretty models, this site alone has plenty. GW needs to totally reasses white dwarf as a concept. My thought would be to make it an E-zine, and maybe give subscribers back-access to old white dwarfs, rules systems, etc. Save them and us money.
I am on the internet all the time. However I still like the feel of a magazine. Not only that it is a bit more portable and handy if you want to reference a picture or article away from the computer. I admit I am a subscriber. I like looking at the art. I like to know what is coming out soon, and even some of the articles are ok. The magazine has definitely been up and down lately. I think the last several issues have seen a big improvement over what they did when they made a big format change not too long ago. Again probably because they listened to what the consumer wanted. As long as it remains profitable for them to put out - I see no reason to get rid of it and go purely web based.

Personally I was sad to see Dragon and Dungeon magazine go away to the web.

Conclusion:
GW has the advantage of being a large company to totally take advantage of modern global supply chaining. They just simply haven't. My feeling is that they still think its the mid-90's and Warhammer is some underground word of mouth thing. Well, it isn't. They need a better business model and supply system so they can push more volume when the economy is good and demand is high, and then cut it back when the economy is low and demand is low.

Note: Pricing of models are another issue altogether. This is about how to run the company, not necessarily how improve customer satisfaction.
You can't imagine a publicly traded company would have outdated business practices. While I am sure many mistakes are made and there is always room for improvement it seems unlikely that they are stuck in a certain time frame of business strategies. I am sure this change in ranks is because they realize things need to change/improve and with fresh ideas it might be possible for them. Over the next year we will probably start to see changes. Let's hope they are for the better. :)

Cheers,

-Mike
 

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Senior Member
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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
These posts are getting long, so reponses are in red within the quote.

You have some very well thought out comments here. I too don't have an MBA either... My jab was at simple inflammatory statements with nothing to back them up.


I won't pretend to have an answer for this though I have an idea why GW wants a certain dollar amount purchased by independent retailers. By selling in an independent retailer they are staking their reputation of product on the retailer. By requiring such a high dollar stock they are helping make sure that their lines are fleshed out and available. The high dollar amount also helps curb the discounts (to some extent) and make sure that GW hits thier profit numbers...

While I don't agree with GW's policy of not allowing displayed web sales of their products at a discount I can understand their business philosophy behind it. They lack control of the market that way and it directly hurts their own instore and online presence.

This is more about what you see in the back of the store. Display wise, I agree. From what I understand though, stores are required to keep an exceptionally large amount of backstock to carry GW official. That policy should go.


Retail space wise they simply don't have the space to put the smaller less popular games on display. On the web all of the Gothic, Mordheim, bloodbowl, etc. is readily available. The store front is what gives GW their unique stance. While they might not all be "profitable" I personally find it and interesting form of marketing. What other game company basically gives full support for their product at a store? They will do everything from get the product for you, give you space to build and paint it, and a place to play. If you need rules help they will offer it. It is a pretty unique thing and I would hate to see it disappear.

Also please note that I live fairly close to a battle bunker but don't go there regularly and don't play very often. I mainly paint. I just like the idea of the store and its functionality to their advertising and support.

I think we are starting to see change in the way they do business. Agreed.Especially online. With the new bitz re-organizing they are streamlining and cutting costs in how they used to work their online orders. Not necessarily a good thing overall but they are definitely not stagnating in a "90's business environment" whatever that means. I am sure they work dillegently on seeking out new ways to keep their product expectation and support in place while trying to reduce costs... it is the nature of business. Ultimately you usually lose some good things.

What I'm getting at here is that GW is company that is insulated from some market forces due to its niche market. When I say 90's business environment, I mean pre-modern supply chain softwere and business models, which mostly began in 2000 and 2001. I'm not saying they're not modern, I'm saying it's not where it should/could be. I don't know if these other games like Warmachine have been doing well the last few years, but if they are, it's indicative that GW needs to get back on the ball.


In a niche hobby to begin with you can't expect their smaller games to outsell and outperform their big ones... Thier smaller games are a niche to a niche hobby. I love bloodbowl and know people who enjoy it - but I know more than enjoy 40k more that don't play bloodbowl.

That's where I feel the mistake lies. Small games will always fail if it's just a smaller fish in a smaller pond. GW needs to find a way to expand its market to run smaller game systems concurrently with larger systems. Considering the successes of magic, heroclix, and all these other small game lines, I'm sure they can figure out a way to do it.

From a business perspective why invest money in something that will not perform to their expectations. It doesn't make sense. You and I both know companies don't always do things that are "logical." Now they still do support it to a point with their online presence so it is still accessible to some point. Would I like them to emphasize the smaller games more? sure! It just isn't all that likely. They do periodically visit some of their older stuff and make new models. Just isn't regular.

I'm saying it could be. More over, GW needs to control their stock better. They've gone from 800/share in 2004 to 400/share in 2006 to 200/share as of now. 80% loss of stock implies some serious business model issues, even factoring loss of clients from LotR ending.

I am on the internet all the time. However I still like the feel of a magazine. Not only that it is a bit more portable and handy if you want to reference a picture or article away from the computer. I admit I am a subscriber. I like looking at the art. I like to know what is coming out soon, and even some of the articles are ok. The magazine has definitely been up and down lately. I think the last several issues have seen a big improvement over what they did when they made a big format change not too long ago. Again probably because they listened to what the consumer wanted. As long as it remains profitable for them to put out - I see no reason to get rid of it and go purely web based.

Personally I was sad to see Dragon and Dungeon magazine go away to the web.

I'm assuming the magazine isn't profitable, but can't verify it. I see where you're coming from on the aesthetic factor, I still think it needs a serious overhaul.

You can't imagine a publicly traded company would have outdated business practices. While I am sure many mistakes are made and there is always room for improvement it seems unlikely that they are stuck in a certain time frame of business strategies. I am sure this change in ranks is because they realize things need to change/improve and with fresh ideas it might be possible for them. Over the next year we will probably start to see changes. Let's hope they are for the better. :)

Their stock, link, rose from 150 to 200 in the last month, so the new CEO may be doing something right.

Cheers,

-Mike
 

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That's where I feel the mistake lies. Small games will always fail if it's just a smaller fish in a smaller pond. GW needs to find a way to expand its market to run smaller game systems concurrently with larger systems. Considering the successes of magic, heroclix, and all these other small game lines, I'm sure they can figure out a way to do it.

Over the last few years they have worked at expanding their core games. First with Cities of Death, and now with Apocolypse they have added a new dynamic to their game. Also with their occasional revamping of older material - such as when they redid Battlefleet gothic a few years ago and the mighty empires last year - they are trying to do something...

I agree that some of the little niche games are cool and in some cases more fun and I do hope they continue to revamp or even persue other newer things - but I don't see that as something that is economically viable for them. Perhaps if there is a strong want from the consumer they will persue and test new things...

Right now I am guessing that it is more economically viable to license out the name and have other companies take a stab at new stuff. There was a collectable card game out for 40k I believe. I want to say a company named sabertooth took it on. Not to mention their licensing for the rpg games and talisman.

The stuff exists it just isn't on the front lines of their shelves. Also if I am not mistaken you can order pretty much anything they produce and have it sent to the store. So if you know what you want and it is available they will be more than happy to get it for you. some of the more popular "specialist games" are on the shelves (at least at the battle bunkers).

I keep hearing how poorly the LoTR stuff is doing - but is that more of people posting it here don't play? It must be doing well enough to continue. It is advertised like crazy still, I see it played at the battle bunker, it is listed continuously in their calendar of events. I would think that even though sales may be down from when the movies were out - it sells better than popular opinion would dictate. It would be interesting to see some actual numbers on that...

Cheers,

-Mike
 

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LO's Resident Time Lord
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Some very interesting posts here. I won't quote, as there are too many to comment on, but I'll just add the following:

Does anyone know if GW manufactures its products anywhere outside the UK? If not (and I know they don't do it in Oz), this is a HUGE hole in their supply chain in which millions of (insert currency here) drown annually, I imagine. If they haven't already, they simply need to build just ONE factory in its chief foreign markets (US, maybe France or another EU/Mainland European nation, Oz), or at least outsource production to an existing facility in those countries. Doing so will be expensive in the short term, and may cost them the release of some new plastic ranges, but within five years the savings would be enormous: No more international shipping, no more tariffs... Japanese car manufacturers have figured this out in the US and saved a fortune, even after cutting prices on products sold in Amerca. No, the auto industry is NOT the same as the niche tabletop game industry, but still, GW needs to take note. It just MIGHT be a relatively quick way to allow the company to reduce prices and STILL turn higher profits. Everybody wins!

Re White Dwarf: I agree that the "magazine" is now little more than a poorly-produced ad supplement, and is sorely in need of a revamp. No Quarter magazine has far more interesting reading in it on PP games. WD USED to do this, but lost it way somewhere. I don't agree with the e-zine idea, as that would eliminate the print version, and having the magazine on display at stores that sell GW products (I'm talking independent stores here, not the GW stores) instantly announces to new customers that the store sells GW products, and serves as another vehicle to call attention to the GW brand for potential new players. In short, it needs to stay, but it needs to be... better.

Just my quick thoughts.
 

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Thread Killer!
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I know for sure that they have distribution in the US (Glen Burnie, MD I believe) not 100% sure about manufacturing here. I also believe they have something similar in Australia and I would guess probably at least 1 more key location in Europe.

Also on E-Zines... doesn't Black Gobbo already fit this bill?

Cheers,

-Mike
 

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LO's Resident Time Lord
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I know for sure that they have distribution in the US (Glen Burnie, MD I believe) not 100% sure about manufacturing here. I also believe they have something similar in Australia and I would guess probably at least 1 more key location in Europe.
Yes, I'm sure they do have distribution centers, but they still manufacture the product in the UK, I think, and still have to ship it to the country, chew through the red tape (time is money), pay (in some cases, outrageous) import fees/tariffs, etc., all of which jack up the prices the customers pay, price hikes that, contrary to popular anti-corporate belief, do NOT end up lining GW's pockets, more like it helps the company tread water. Outsourcing your production TO those countries will eliminate a lot of those headaches. Sure, it creates problems, too, but I have yet to hear of a company who tried this and DIDN'T wind up winning in the end.
 

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just something to let you think about Microsoft losses money on nearly all of its products and yet?

i have off and on worked at a place called game traders they sell second hand games and also buy them there secret phosiphy is that they dont need to give discounts as they have very good customer relationships often organizing tournaments for games like halo and gears of war these ventures are never directly profitable they only serve to build up a set of loyal customers which in the past is prissily what gw has done they are now forgetting this but still charge a premium on all there products with out giving a award to loyal customers as game traders dose
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
just something to let you think about Microsoft losses money on nearly all of its products and yet?

i have off and on worked at a place called game traders they sell second hand games and also buy them there secret phosiphy is that they dont need to give discounts as they have very good customer relationships often organizing tournaments for games like halo and gears of war these ventures are never directly profitable they only serve to build up a set of loyal customers which in the past is prissily what gw has done they are now forgetting this but still charge a premium on all there products with out giving a award to loyal customers as game traders dose
Up until recently I'd agree on some points, but I think Apocalypse was evidence that GW does think of its long time loyal gamers. I do think they need to do more of it, and hopefully GW will see this too with the high sales they got of their Apocalypse expansion. Apocalypse was clearly designed for vetern gamers and GW made a pretty tidy profit (their stock went up at least), so hopefully they'll do more of that in the future.
 
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