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Hi guys i try to use perfect grammer, but this is not school this is the net so it hard to be proper. Anyways, I was trying out some washes and i think i got a good grip on some them but others I "Bleep Up". So i was wondering, do you guys use games work shop washes, which to me seem, think and if so do you water them down with 50/50 water ? To make a black wash with normal black paint how much would you water it down 50/50?

I am a complete novice when it comes to washes so please say it as dumbly as possible.
 

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Fury of the Ages
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hey mate,

Washes are something that you have to practice to get right. Consistency, where you wash and how much you use.

And it also depends if you want the wash to tint the paint, or to actually create darker spots as well.

If you want the wash just to tint the paint, then 70 : 30 water to paint.

To create darker areas and shades, then around 50 : 50 is okay, but this all depends on the actual paint, the colour and how much pigment is in it.

I would recommend that you just practice as much as possible! Get a mini with some different areas, and try out different consistencies.
You don't have to get right on the numbers, just get a feel for it. I never have a dropper and measure out each part carefully.

And lastly, everyone has their own style. You will find yours. Do some washes on a mini, then give yourself a day without looking at it, then have a look and ask yourself if you like what you see. :)
 

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things will change
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Hi guys i try to use perfect grammer, but this is not school this is the net so it hard to be proper.
Just out of interest, why do you say this?
I generally try to use whatever language I'm using as properly as possible, but then maybe this is just me.

Thanks for trying though, it is much easier to read your post.

Personally I do use GW inks, but generally not for shading. I tend to find that they leave a gloss finish, which always seems a little odd, considering you're generally shading the recessed/dark areas of a model.
For washes, I tend to mix my own.

As far as 'making' washes goes (good to see you're trying some of the advice you've been given), I would reccomend starting off at a 70 : 30 water : paint mix. If the paint still acts too much like 'paint' (as in, you can't see much of what you're painting it over) then you need too add more water.

When you're mixing it up, use a pallette, and simple use your brush as a rough measuring implement. Put down 3 blobs of paint on the pallette, then 7 blobs of water. Mix until the paint has a single consistancy, then try it on a model.

Something I find very helpful with washes is using a piece of tissue paper to test the consistancy of the mix. Simply put a dab of the wash onto the paper using your brush. If it is sufficiently thin, it should easily spread out over the paper, going slightly transparent. If it is too thick, it will 'bead' up, forming a blob, and hardly spreading at all.

The best way to figure these things out is, at the end of the day, to experiment. Play with a few of your models, and see what happens.

-t.
 

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kinkeh secks pl0x?!
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Hi scarycrow im glad your taking advice.

when i use Washes i do the same as -T. except i make washes from Vallejo Game Colours. If you are unaware of this company you should check them out! there amazing!

I do use Brown Ink quite alot FOR ANYTHING! i love it, it is my favourite ink!

Just something you may want to consider.

-Tib
 

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Woof! Woof! Bark! Bark!!!
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this is the net so it hard to be proper.
*looks at your signature*



If I am reading the equation correctly, x works out to -2.5 and 1.658 (since it's quadratic)

(-2.5^2)+(-2.5*5)+9 / (-2.5+2) = 26
(1.658^2)+(1.658*5)+9 / (1.658+2) = 13

Anyway, I 'm not going to tell you to use good grammar. I am, however, going to point out that this board has many members to whom English is not their first language. It is a courtesy to them, as well of the rest of us, to use good grammar, spelling, and punctuation, in order to be understood by all the board's users.

If you think about it, you should be proper because it's the net!

As for washes, please remember the following things:

-Thinner (I.E., more water) will be more forgiving.
-Inks are easier to use than paint.
-WAIT an hour or two (preferably more) before evaluating the wash. This gives it time to dry, and set a little.








.
 

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*looks at your signature*

Anyway, I 'm not going to tell you to use good grammar. I am, however, going to point out that this board has many members to whom English is not their first language. It is a courtesy to them, as well of the rest of us, to use good grammar, spelling, and punctuation, in order to be understood by all the board's users.

.
Oh, so thats why I got yelled at for not using good grammar. From now on I will ( I don't like to capitalize or use apostrophes.)

This was almost a pretty useful thread, but, I would like to ask, how do you get the wash to not get on the outside of the crevasses, like you paint a model light gray, and want to get the crevasses(sp) black, so you use an ink, and it gets the whole model black. What have I been doing wrong? I just decided to not use washes from then on.
 

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Fury of the Ages
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Its possible that you're not watering the wash down enough, and your using too much on your brush. Try putting a bit more water in, and wiping the excess off on a tissue before painting onto the model.

If it doesn't look that dark to begin with, don't worry, just let it dry and do multiple coats. I find you can control the colour much better this way as you are tinting it a bit at a time.

When your painting, think about what parts you want to be darker, then try and stick to those areas, not over the whole model.
 

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In abbreviated form read what Solo wrote above.

I am not really an expert on inking and washes (or any painting style) but when I do use them I tend to wash and then go back over and re-highlight. Just to make sure that the wash is only in the right place.

The other thing you could try and this you will just have to experiment with a bit to get right, water you washes and inks down even more (you may already be doing this) the paint will spread more but have less pigment, as it settles and dries the pigment will magically have drifted into cracks and gaps and you may not need to go over much (works best with armours).

One other tip don't overload your brush, someone here (-t or Slorak, I don't know which but both to be listened too) mentioned using a 0 brush and having the paint dry on the brush if they weren't quick, I often use 00 and finer brushes and that has never ever happened to me. The more paint, particularly a runny ink, the more room for error, I use less paint now (still hasn't dried on the brush) and have much better control over where the paint goes useful when washing robes and cloaks etc.

Hope it helps
Allonairre
 

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Its possible that you're not watering the wash down enough, and your using too much on your brush. Try putting a bit more water in, and wiping the excess off on a tissue before painting onto the model.

If it doesn't look that dark to begin with, don't worry, just let it dry and do multiple coats. I find you can control the colour much better this way as you are tinting it a bit at a time.

When your painting, think about what parts you want to be darker, then try and stick to those areas, not over the whole model.
SO then should I put the water in the paint pot? or on my palette? I don't really use it, and when I do, its only for VMC paints. (Vallejo Model Color?) And I really have no use for washes in my SM army, but for my 'nids and tau I do. thanks
 

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Fury of the Ages
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SO then should I put the water in the paint pot? or on my palette? I don't really use it, and when I do, its only for VMC paints. (Vallejo Model Color?) And I really have no use for washes in my SM army, but for my 'nids and tau I do. thanks
I do it on the pallette, that way you get the consistency just right for what you are doing at the time.

And as Allonaire said, re-highlighting is always an option, as long as you watch the colours in the highlight and make sure they aren't that much different from the wash. If the washed part gets too dark, painting the original colour back on may look a bit severe.

Hope you can understand what I just wrote! :rofl
 

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Woof! Woof! Bark! Bark!!!
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how do you get the wash to not get on the outside of the crevasses, like you paint a model light gray, and want to get the crevasses(sp) black, so you use an ink, and it gets the whole model black.
Firstly, when you are brushing the wash on the model, the whole thing will get darker. This is normal. Only once it dries it should be more toards the crevasses, and less on the high points. Please judge it only once it's dry.

Second, it sounds like you are using the ink or wash WAY to thick. Try using a palette - an old dish or saucer works really well - and use at least 3 parts of water (or more) to 1 part ink, and put a little bit of white (pva) glue in the mix. About a pinhead of glue. Mix it with the brush on the palette until it's smooth and then brush it on the model. The glue helps it gather in the cracks and crevasses, and helps with the effect you are trying to get.

Hope this helps.
 
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