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Banned
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56 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi I got the basic highlighting down no problem, but i was wondering how do you go about multi highlight. Examples Scorched brown, with highlight of besatical brown then highlight with grave yard earth. Do I dry brush the last 2or3, or am I lost
 

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Fury of the Ages
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753 Posts
No, you don't have to drybrush them on (but I suppose you could, can't imagine that it would look that good though)

Basically, instead of using the one colour to highlight, you use multiple colours to get a smoother effect. So in between the darkest colour and the lightest colour, you put one or two different shades.

So, start with your base colour first. Next, apply your lighter shade in a strip towards the edge. Then, apply another even lighter strip in a thinner strip, leaving some of the first one showing. Then you can finish with your lightest colours right in a thin strip along the edge.

This is called layering and you can do as many "layers" as you want to get your highlights and shading nice and smooth.

:)
 

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A bit of alright.
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675 Posts
Layering is the way to go, if you drybrush those colours you'll end up with a very dry look.
That's a fairly good layering guide by solo, better than I have the time to offer you. Take yor time and use a standard brush is the best advice I can offer on the subject.
Scorched brown, bestial brown, graveyard earth may give an odd effect as bestial brown is not directly inbetween the other two, it's the reason many people mix when there is an alternative.
To hilight you can drybrush, blend layer and hit the fine edges. I almost always layer now and I think the results speak for themselves; if you are good at layering then the model paints itself.
 

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Sparta!
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1,438 Posts
Another trick I use - most often only on centrepiece models or characters where I don't have to repeat too often - is to add increasing amounts of skull white to your base colour - this gives the effect of keeping all the colours consistent and smooth, and if you have the patience you can even get up to a pure white on the very edge if that's what you desire.
 

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The Fallen
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7,745 Posts
what all the previous posters are talking about is layering or dry blending (same thing) - try looking in the stickies at the top of the forum, I am sure we have an article somewhere
 

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Ender of Threads
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1,306 Posts
Another trick I use - most often only on centrepiece models or characters where I don't have to repeat too often - is to add increasing amounts of skull white to your base colour - this gives the effect of keeping all the colours consistent and smooth, and if you have the patience you can even get up to a pure white on the very edge if that's what you desire.
Good tip, but use this one with some common sense... Keep adding white to red, and you're eventually gonna wind up with pink. If that's what you're going for, go right ahead. If not, you're going to have to experiment with alternatives - orange and/or yellow for this example.
 

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Sparta!
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1,438 Posts
Good tip, but use this one with some common sense... Keep adding white to red, and you're eventually gonna wind up with pink. If that's what you're going for, go right ahead. If not, you're going to have to experiment with alternatives - orange and/or yellow for this example.
Of course, I should probably add that if you want an even more gradual and realistic approach to it, mix in increasing quantaties of the next appropriate colour and work through the spectrum.
E.g. For a red armour I usually start off with a basecoat of red gore then mix 1/2 red gore and blood red then go to straight blood red - leaving the darker shades in the recesses. Then start mixing firey orange into blood red in increasing amounts until you get to pure fiery orange, and then start mixing the white into the orange.
Most other colours you can get away with just adding white to the main colour (not the base coat). E.g. blues, yellows, oranges, browns etc all work well with just the white.

Note: the reason I say not the basecoat is that it is always a good idea to basecoat models in a darker shade than what you want them to end up - it is easier to highlight up then it is to paint in shading. A darker basecoat gives you instant shadow in the recess.
 

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LO's Resident Time Lord
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3,270 Posts
Just a quick "yeah what he said" about mixing colors. Lightening a darker color by mixing in lighter stuff is good, but you have to watch how you do it. For general mixing, chaos black is a good darkening agent, and skull white a good lightener, but white + red = pink, which is usually NOT what you're trying to do.

Instead, be sure to use yellow as an alternative mixer in cases like that. Also, black does not always mix well with "earthy" tones, so when you're using browns and flesh tones, consider using lighter browns and/or bleached bone to lighten, mixing with white only on the brightest of highlights. To darken, use a very dark brown, say, scorched brown.

Finally, if you're painting IG or another army with a lot of models, you might consider sucking it up and just buying extra paints, rather than trying to mix it. Especially with GW, it can be hard to get the exact same mixing ratio from batch to batch, which can make your results look inconsistent. If this matters to you, forego mixing up a "lighter" color altogether, and just go out and buy a lighter version. Keeps you sane if you have a lot to paint.
 
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