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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi all. I'm about to paint a 2000 pt BA army and was wondering what would happen if i just did not prime the plastic mini's at all. Blood Red spray is going to be used for the base coat. I know for one it would save time, but what about the the downsides to this? Let me know what you all think. Thanks in advance.

Bro A
 

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Without priming, the paint will have a tendancy to flake off when handled.
 

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Monkey of Mystery
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It's very, very, very, very important indeed. The base coat sprays (black and white) are paints formulated to stick to plastic and metal and hold other paints over the top. The colour sprays are formulated to just give a good solid colour- no sticking, much rubbing-off/anger/aggravation.
I can't emphasise how important a white spray undercoat should be to a Blood Angel collector. I personally only use the sprays on vehicles (remember- even with sprays several light coats is better than one heavy coat) because I find that the inks sometimes don't behave normally over a colour spray. I've written a guide to painting BAs quickly by hand- I'll try and find it if you're interested.

p.s.- good choice of army.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks! That would be most appretiated. I could use a good solid guide to painting a BA army. The guides I've seen out of GW just don't seem to work all that great. Send me that guide if you can.

Bro A
 

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Monkey of Mystery
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I can't find the other one (or maybe I only wrote it in my head?) So...

Ok, easy stuff first clean up all the bits and remove any mould lines.

Assemble most of the figure in a pleasing manner- I usually leave off the bolter and sometimes the shoulder plates (remember this is for a regular marine figure, the techniques will work on anything but for Devs you might want to paint the big gun seperately or leave off an assault marine jump pack etc). This is up to you but make sure you can reach all the bits like the chest eagle.
Spray everything white. I put all the figures together and spray them all at once. Usually you have to go through and touch up the odd place you’ve missed but remember to use several thin coats rather than a single too-thick hosing down.
When the white is dry enough (I usually wait 30 minutes- go make a coffee or a sandwich) choose a squad you’re going to start with (about 8-10 figs is good). Mix up some blood red paint with red ink. You can use an empty paint pot for this or anything that will stop the paint flowing around your work area- you’ll need quite a bit so a flat tile won’t hold enough (usually). You might want to dry to add a tiny drop of dishwashing fluid at this stage but it’s not necessary. You want to mix the paints so that it runs easily but isn’t so thin as to carry no colour. I use about 50/50 but experimentation will guide you (it’s better to start too thin). Now- here’s the cool part- because it’s very thin and flows well you can just lash it onto the figure with a big brush big, as in tank-brush not base-coat brush. Work it around so it doesn’t pool too much and if it’s too thick just add a drop of ink. When the figure is completely covered go onto the next. By the time you’ve painted 8 or 10 figures the first one will be dry enough for the second coat (he’ll be looking pink at the moment). Usually 3-4 thin coats like this is enough to give a really strong, glowing red. Avoid the temptation to apply only the ink- this will go shiny and make the figure look a bit weird. If it doesn’t seem to be working that well keep adjusting your paint mix and adding thin coats until you have a clean, smooth and even red colour. The first few attempts may take longer but once you’ve settled on a method that works this stage gets really quick.
When all the figures are completely red you can go through with black paint and pick out the details- eyes, joints, backpack nozzles, shoulder plate trim, bolters (if you left these separate then get them all together and give them a blast of black paint to save time). You can also paint the chest eagle scorched brown at this stage. You can also shade the figure slightly at this stage by mixing red ink and a dark red or almost purple colour for the final (make it thinner) wash.
The figure is now table-top ready (if you paint the base green) but you can keep going. Pick out the eyes with a strong green and I also paint the grenades green. Highlight the eagle with brown/bleached bone (you might want to try drybrushing it but don’t it’ll invariably look better layered and you don’t want to risk messing up your red). Use a very thin highlight of orange/red ink to paint the very edges of the marines armour (too big a highlight and the figure will look orange).
Once you’ve detailed and highlighted the figure as much as you want finish the base, glue on the bolter (use a tiny drop of super glue- too much and it will scorch the surrounding paint) and you’re done.

Cool?
 
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