Librarium Online Forums banner

1 - 12 of 12 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
383 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
They never come out right and end up making my model look dirty, shiny or just plain bad. I've a feeling I'm either using ink that's too thick or too thin, what I want to know is how I find the median that helps add a little depth to my models' paint schemes whilst not totally overpowering the paint that's already on it or making it all sparkly?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
29 Posts
When in doubt, go thinner on the ink and apply the ink in a couple goes. But you should wait for each layer to dry or nearly dry before the next.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
655 Posts
Shiny is not really a problem. My models tend to be very shiny after I give them a wash(I use Future Floor Wax to help thin my paint... it's a bit glossy.) However, after doing some highlights and dry brushing over that... it tends to cut a lot of the gloss. After all of that, hit it with a matte finish... that'll cut any gloss that remains.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
1,318 Posts
Remember, ink and repaint, ink and repaint, build it up. Also I've hear that mixed ink with rubbing alcohol with have it sink to the pores better.
 

·
Monkey of Mystery
Joined
·
2,789 Posts
Yeah, inks can be a real dog until you learn how to get a handle on them. And sadly thqt really only comes with experience.
A couple of pointers though- learn which inks leave a gloss and try to avoid them. Instead use thinned versions of paints. Shiny shadows look a bit weird!! I know blue, chestnut and flesh wash are pretty notorious- why anyone uses flesh wash is beyond me.
Also try thinning paints with inks- this gives darker colours for shading and will reduce the gloss a bit.
If you're using an ink for the first time write down about how much you've thinned it with water so you can get the same consistency later. Remember- start with more water rather than more ink!
I've not heard of rubbing alcohol but I know a tiny drop of dish-washing liquid in your painting water will help inks flow when they are thinned with that water. It helps break the surface viscosity so the ink flows properly.
Once you're happy with this lot try using inks of different colours to give slight tone changes; eg thin brown ink over grey gives the grey and older, worn look withiout being obviously brown and dirty (think Millenium Falcon here). Or purple over skin to give an ill appearance.

Hope this helped!!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
351 Posts
The Paint monkey said:
...I've not heard of rubbing alcohol but I know a tiny drop of dish-washing liquid in your painting water will help inks flow when they are thinned with that water. It helps break the surface viscosity so the ink flows properly.
Rubbing alcohol is very useful to get your color into tight/hard to reach spots as it will run into the nooks & crannys with about twice the speed of watered-down paint. Word of warning though...don't use it on large or fairly flat areas because rubbing alcohol tends to dry quicker than water it will leave "drying lines" (I don't know how to describe it other than kind of like the line of soap scum you can find on the side of your bath tub after you have a bath.) Future floor wax is great to thin your paints but I wouldn't use it straight as it will give you a very shiny sheen...Mix a little water in there as well.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
655 Posts
Wookie said:
Future floor wax is great to thin your paints but I wouldn't use it straight as it will give you a very shiny sheen...Mix a little water in there as well.
Thanks. I suppose I may have been a bit vague there. I am curious how things would work if I used mostly floor wax though. Time to sacrifice a model. :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
17 Posts
If the model comes out shiney try something else... Use the colour paint that you want and add varnish and water to it. Wont be as shiney but is more difficult to use!!!
 

·
The Voice of Reason
Joined
·
756 Posts
I like to thin down my inks considerably. When I first started, I would try to use them as-is; BAD idea. Now I thin them down with water, the ratio depending on what I'm going for. Then its wash-repaint as said above to get the right balance.

The other advantage of inking is that after highlighting, a very light wash can "ease" your highlights, so that they flow more naturally into one another, preventing the "rainbow" effect.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
383 Posts
Discussion Starter · #11 ·
RJSuperfreaky said:
I like to thin down my inks considerably. When I first started, I would try to use them as-is; BAD idea.
I think this is the big problem I'm having, I'm slapping them on unthinned which doesn't seem to work. Like, at all. Luckily enough I've got a few of the Smurfs left from the n00b painting set left to experiment with, thanks all for the advice :D
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
17 Posts
Another tip, if your thinning the ink to reduce the intensity of the colour add water AND pva glue. PVA enhances the gathering qualities of a wash and produces a good contrast when it is dry. We've all been through it when you slap the ink on and think, "wow, it looks great" to be disappointed when it dries!

Alternatively, if you want to reduce the gathering qualitis of the ink, to produce an overall tone, add a little liquid soap as mentioned before, this breaks the surface tension so the ink stains the surface more uniformly without creating unwanted patches*.

*these are good for flesh, not for armour like marines and stuff!!!

another method is to add varnish to the paint, this makes ink more inkey. Give it a try.

lastly, washes work very well over what is known as pastel colours. add a little white to the basecoat and see the effects for yourself.

True, though. Experimentation is the best way to go, so happy painting-just don't get too messy!
 
1 - 12 of 12 Posts
Top