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What's the main differences between Inks and Paints.
I've never painted models before (at least not miniatures) and don't know what each one of these is. They both come in bottles, no?

Anyway... are inks more for highlighting and paints for the heavier coats?

Thanks for any help.
 

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Lord of the Household
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Well the paints are .. paints and the inks are.. well.. inks....

The inks are thinner so they are for shading.
 

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Inks are thinner and more transparent than paints so they are only more visible as they collect up in the recesses of your model, which can be helpful for shading. Paint is simply used to achieve a base color for your model before shading and highlighting.
For example if one of your models was wearing tan-colored clothing and you know how cloth wrinkles when you move your arm or something..you would use ink that is darker than the cloth color (so it would be brown ink in this case) and fill in the recesses to get a fake shaded look.
 

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Lord of the Household
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Well I paint it on like it was regular paint but I only paint it in the areas that need to be shaded (cracks etc.) Another approach is to water it down slightly and cover the entire area of that colour so that it will sink in by itself.
 

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Black ink is extremely hard to use, it will take away all brightness from the base color where you apply it. Always thin it.
Personally, i use it in order to darken other inks only.

jwu
 

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for black inks, what i do is go ahead and use them, even though Archon's point is very true. But then, and i do this mostly for skulls and imperial eagles, i dry brush over the ink once its dried and the 'crevices' stay inked but the raised parts get there color back too.
 

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NEVER USE INKS! The best way to shade is by base coating the object the darkest shade then gradually adding the lighter color to raised areas. Inks are way too glossy for crevices. When light is shined on the object, the crevices are brighter than the raised areas!This looks very unprofessional to me. I would only use inks to show dirty flesh or clothing by watering the ink down. I used to use inks on my models,I never had luck with this. Even though painting the shade in yourself is harder, you will be rewarded with a very well contrasted model.
 

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Try going through a full build up process of color highlights then use ink very carefully in the cracks. It can get you a very nice effect. And to say to not use inks doesn't make sense to me, if the boys we see in White Dwarf every month use it, there must be a reason behind it.

Just my 6 cents (increase from 2 cents due to inflation).

Uncle Jesse
 

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Inks are great if used correctly, as they are much more transparent than regular paints. I also use them as additives to regular paints to make them thinner and still allowing them to coat well. Black ink is probably the most difficult to use and I usually only use it as an additive, but all of the others are very useful on their own.
 
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