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King of the Burning Sands
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Few question. First, is the paint better thick, diluted, or watery? Second, if its better diluted or watery, how do u control the area coverage without spills? Lastly, how do you guys figure out the color pyramids (the layer build up)?
 

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Few question. First, is the paint better thick, diluted, or watery? Second, if its better diluted or watery, how do u control the area coverage without spills? Lastly, how do you guys figure out the color pyramids (the layer build up)?
well to start it really depends on your way of painting and the paint you use. Most will tell you that it is better diluted, and the amount should look like about a milk consistency. You control the dilution from practice.

I use the GW paints, and i dont water mine down. I dont paint too thickly so it has never been a problem. As far the color pyramids, its just practice. You usually use the same color for multiple models, so you get a good idea of what the highlighting colors should be and if you need to dilute or mix them so that they look natural.

Sorry i couldn't be of much help.
 

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Cthulhu's Lovechild
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Thin enough to flow nicely but thick enough for decent coverage.
 

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A bit of alright.
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I tend to just dilute until the consistency is perfectly smooth, then I just plonk it on.
The best way to avoid overflow is to be very accurate with your brush and have the paint pool towards the center, rather than the edge, of the surface.
If the paint does spill over it is usially easy to correct. (unless you've just done ten or so glazes, then you just have to cry)
I don't use colour pyramids, I tend to just add kommando khaki until I'm satisfied, so there's not a lot I can say to that.
 

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How do you guys make the transition between the highlight/shade colours smooth? I only attempted hilighting/shading a few times since I started painting recently and I'd like to improve the transition between colours.

I read about "wet-blending" where you paint two colours at the same time and mix the edges but that's kinda hard and you gotta be fast, do you guys use this technique often?

Thank you,
 

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A bit of alright.
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I used to wet blend but found it to be far too impractical; I mostly layer now.
There are a few ways to get layering to look right:
Use loads of very thin layers that merge when looked at.
Use thin paint so as the previous colour is still visible underneath.
Use washes or glazes to pull the layers togeather.
Don't bother hiding the layers at all. (sounds bad until you see Dallimore's stuff)

I like to use a combination of those ways, there might be more though.
 

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Use washes or glazes to pull the layers togeather.
Don't bother hiding the layers at all. (sounds bad until you see Dallimore's stuff)
Would you mind elaborating on these two points a bot more or point me to places? Tha't be cool, thanks for the tips.
 

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A bit of alright.
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Cool, thanks. I'm gonna have to try these one day. So you're saying that Dallimore guy doesn't blend at all (that's what it looks like on the pics)? I guess that's fine until you get up close.
 

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A bit of alright.
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He does a bit but he often leaves clear colour transitions visible. Along with those funny hands it's sort of his trademark.
 

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Thread Killer!
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To keep paint from pooling up on the model when you thin your paints - you can always wick off some of the paint onto a paper towel. Keep in mind the more you thin the paints the more transparent they will be. This is fine but keep in mind that it will usually take more layers to get a smooth color transition.

As for what colors to use for highlights - What I will usually do is either take the colors right next to the base color (especially for GW paints and Vallejo game colors) or I will usually take the base color and keep adding more and more bone white to the color to lighten it. I like to use bone because it is not really white but still light enough to lighten up the base color.

Cheers,

-Mike
 

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Ok here is my method of Highlighting/shading. This is reall amature but it works wonders for me.

My shading is just the absence of highlights. So i start with a base color that is darker then i want the model to be. I undercoat everything black for two reasons: 1) it forces me to put on more players for the color to look right and gives me a lot more depth, 2) i am in fact an amature, so if i miss a spot it looks black, which stands out a lot less then other base colors.

I found this while using the GW guide to paint some of my Eldar Aspects, the DA is found here:

Warhammer 40,000 - Eldar

The summary of the thing is that you leave that darker color in the deepest part of the model, highlight the mid ranges with the color you actually want the model to be, then highlight one (or two) steps further up for the actual highlight.

The results have been wonderful and i get tons of complaments on my models, even from people who are much more talented then i am. Some say i could do some serious commision work.

In all actually its just a small illusion, i dont use glazes or anything fancy, i will use a wash occationally depending on the texture. I just layer all my models and they look really good, if i had a camera i might post some, but alas i dont.

I hope this helps at all.
 

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A bit of alright.
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Neat layers are truly somthing to be aspired to; don't belittle yourself in that fashion, a confident brush produces great results.
 
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