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Junior Member
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
...hard to paint.

I've decided to finally get around to painting a squad of LOD marines (OOP, very rare), which I got off EBay. Because these are quite special to me I've decided to have a go at non-metallic metal for the shading of the black Armour. This, to put it lightly, is a little tricky. So I've built a test piece to test out my ideas and practice a bit before committing to doing the whole squad.

I chose 2 light sources and used a blue hint for 2 and just for fun, I tried a yellow one for the third. One thing I've learned about the NMM technique is that reflections are very rarely pure white. I used paint thinned down with blending medium and used cellophane wrap between applications to keep the paint reservoirs from drying out as I used quite a few layers, progressively getting lighter. Finally I washed the whole thing in Badab black to blend the layers. Didn't work out quite as I'd hoped but it's not a bad start.

Here is Mr Choppy, test peice 1. Comments and suggestions welcome... :beer:







 

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i like the base thats awsome just maybe you should add some flames or spikes onto the actualy modle as it all silver which in my eyes doesnt look to good. nice glowing afect though.
 

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Junior Member
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Hi, thanks.

I wanted to see what the armour NMM effect would look like before going on to paint all the skulls, flames and words all over it which would obscure a lot of that. I need to work on my flames a bit too.

Silver? I was going for the 'black shiney car in the sun look' - I guess the blue highlight is a bit strong through (as is the yellow) - I think I'll try and tone that down a bit for the next one. Just want to get the effect right before I go on to do all the other models.

The yellow glow effect worked nicely but it looks (as with the blue) like the light source is very small and very close - which is probably because I lit it with a lamp to see where the reflections were, which I now know not to do. I think next time I'll stick it near the window on a bright day and check where the light hits the model. Sunlight is a lot 'bigger' if you get my drift. I think this technique might work well though for lighting from objects near the model, like power swords and such.

There'll be some new ones soon.
 
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