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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am new to painting and am unfamiliar with any artistic techniques. I have recenlty painted my 1st Vanguard and Something seems to be off. I don't know if it's to many colors or something else. Any tips or suggestion please

Thanks!
Wood Musical instrument Sculpture Flooring Art Wood Finial Gas Art Musical instrument
 

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Benevolent Dictator
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Hey there, welcome to the forum!
I guess I'll bite and try to help you out - I'm not master painter myself though, like some of the other guys here. Anything I give you is mostly geared towards "table top quality" or a little better.

First off - for ttq, that's pretty darn good! I come from Fantasy where I paint a couple dozen models per regiment, so maybe 40k is a little different since you're expected to take the same amount of time and get "more quality, less quantity"

For advice:

1) Trim your mold lines. The little raised edges around some of your bits, where the two halves of the mold came together. You can see a pretty good one right down the center of his rifle, and another running horizontally across his arm. It's a bit late now, because you'd have to repaint him, but in the future, you want smooth surfaces. Ink washes and drybrushes will pick up those lines just like they will details, and that's not something you want to showcase on your minis.

2) Grainy. Not sure if it's your camera or the paint, but it looks a bit "coarse" on him. I actually like the effect sometimes - because I like some of the "painterly effects" that guys like John Blanche pull off, where instead of the traditional "it looks so lifelike" reaction, you get a sense that your army has just stepped out of an oil painting our a vintage toy collection.
However, the coarseness can hurt you if you're using the really high-quality techniques like washes and dry brushes, because just like the mold lines, you'll see the bumps more clearly. Thin down your paint with a little water while you work, or google how to make a "wet palette" and you'll be good to go. Remember - lots of thin coats, instead of one thick covering.

3) Highlights. It looks like you already nailed some bits with a nice highlight, and that's cool. Did you highlight your metals though? You actually can, just like you would your normal colors. Your options are to either use a brighter shade of whatever metal (can't remember modern names, but "shining gold" over darker "beaten brass") or you can mix a touch of silver into the metal you were already using.
Another trick that I've read and actually used on some Gears of War miniatures, comes from a really good Warmachine painter I found online. His "secret weapon" is to take a super dry brush of 'Bone' and go over the models extremely lightly. The effect is pretty darn good - if you do it right, you shouldn't actually notice the bone color going on at all, but it picks up all the edges and makes everything sort of "pop" more. I'm sure the award-winner guys do this with specific colors for each different color on the mini, but I use bone because you can literally just dust the whole model with it and it will work on everything.

4) The back robe might be hurting you a bit. It's hard to shade/highlight black. Well, it's impossible to shade it, so you end up having to paint a very dark grey and then go over it with black washes to get the shadows and color right. Then drybrush it back up to it's original color to catch the tops of the folds. Anyways- red is also a pain in the butt to paint, but I think that the brilliant, eye-catching splash of red is why GW chose to do their models that way. It helps to break up the monotony of the metals and "dull bits" and gives them a chance to really work in some awesome shades and highlights. Of course, it's even harder on Skitarii, because there's not a lot of texture in their cloaks to shade/highlight. If you want to "to the wall" with it, I'd look into how to blend. But that's super advanced and super time consuming if you want to do it right. It would let you get a lot more variation in the hues on the robes though, which will help make them look a little more dynamic.
 

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You already got some good advice from Captain. I just want to pint out a few things. Still I think the model looks quite good, but I can nail down a few thinks that makes i seem a bit "off" as you describe him.

First, all colours have a bout the same shade, so nothing stands out, this flatten the model and obscure details. One possibility is to use colours that are more a part.

Second you need more shade and highlight. As you use dark colours the shades should be black or close to black. also you need more highlights . Quickest way is dry brush, but that can look a bit messy. Lining is a good way to go especial for the red area, in your case you can use a pure red.

Usual mistakes from beginners is to thick paint, to little shade and to little highlight. As the model is so small, you have to use more highlight and shade then you think.

(fun facts) The problem with red is that it can be hard to get a good highlight. You have to decide if you want to go for a brighter red that have white in it and then you get feel of pink, or yellow and you get the orange feel. There is also possible to use something in between like skin colour. One alternative is to not highlight it brighter then red, but shade it down to black, still I like a little orange for my extreme highlights.

Good luck :)

Edit: also try to get a good shade between the different colour areas so they stand more apart, it do wonders for the model
 

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Double Clutching Weasel
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As mentioned, you have no variety in your colour palette. You're so tightly bound on the red/orange/yellow section of it, with some grey/black (which are neutral) that the colours are all bleeding together. You need a "spot colour" in places where you want to draw the eye. Like a cyan on the eyes/visor, or some other opposite part of the colour wheel on the icon in the center of the chest. Any colour from the other side of the colour wheel will do.

And, as posted upthread, add some highlights/drybrush to keep the model from looking so "flat". I think the rest of the other posters already mentioned very good suggestions on that front.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thank you all for the response. I have been reluctant to do highlights as it seems to be the hardest part. but I guess if I don't at least try, how can I get better?
Thanks again for the pointers and encouragement!
 
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