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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey everyone!

When painting larger kits, often times it is best to leave some pieces separate from each other until after they have been painted in order to make it easier to reach and paint all areas of the model.

So I was wondering, how do most people do this? Do you leave the part that the glue goes on to connect the two pieces bare of paint, or do you not worry about it and paint over those sections too? If you do, does using plastic glue still work even though paint is over top of it, or is it necessary to use super glue?
 

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Drill Sergeant
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To be honest, It depends on how much effort I want to spend on that one model. If it's just a gaming piece I usually just stick it together and then go from there. If it's a display piece I may half build it so I can get everything done but even then it's usually not much of a problem getting into parts. The main reason I do it is if an arm or weapon blocks part of the face. The face is the most important part so I want to be able to get to that as easily as possible.

To do it I'll cut it off the sprue and then 'pin' it at it's glue point. Usually with the bit of paper clip stuck into a cork or some other 'easy to hold' thing.
 

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I just glue everything together with superglue and paint the whole thing.

That being said if I was going to leave parts separate I would paint where they were going, then file away the paint for the connecting points and attach with superglue.

I always use superglue as plastic actually melts the model to the model. Superglue can be broken apart if you toss the model into the freezer for a bit
 

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Benevolent Dictator
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Like the others, I will very rarely do this. I base coat my minis either black or grey, and I'm not opposed to using a ratty brush to shove into those nooks and crannies. If paint can't get there, I figure that light can't either, and the place remains shaded as dark as possible. Inks will always help too, flowing into places that a brush can't, and helping to blend the shadows.

If I *do* leave the pieces separate, I use a pin vise to attach them to push-pins so they're easier to hold. Then I hand-base them, rather than spraying. I try to keep the joins as clean as possible, but I've noticed that it doesn't seem to make much difference. For your question of glue - plastic glue does "weld" the pieces together by melting them, and it might not do that with paint on (it also ruins paint). Super glue is a less secure bond, but if you do it over paint, I think the paint would strip from the plastic before the glue gave out.

Lastly, this really all depends on your painting ability, as to whether it's even worth it. I've seen people attempt really advanced stuff (usually basing) on models that were painted like utter rubbish. For table-top quality (and even some of the pro stuff out there) it's totally okay to leave the models glued together from the start, 90% of the time. The exceptions, obviously, are things like Flier pilots who are glued in behind fixed canopies.
There are far easier tricks to use to become a better painter. Whether or not you "sub-assemble" is really very minor.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks for the advice guys!

The pinning to a bit of cork or even just filing off a bit of paint at the glue point seem like good ideas. I'm mostly asking about this because I'm planning on painting my necron ghost ark soon along with my skitarii dunecrawler, and it seems really hard to reach all the inside parts of the ghost ark ribs even without putting the 'crons inside, which makes it even worse! The dunecrawler has its connection point well hidden in its joint, and is generally a lot less trouble, which I'm grateful for.

Another thing I've been thinking about is covering the connection point most of the way with poster putty or some such, which should come off easily after the basecoat in theory. Do you think this could work?

PS: Table top quality, while I understand is the fastest way to get to playing with a painted, respectable army, pains my soul when applied to such expensive and beautiful models!
 

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I mostly assemble, too, as with the other posters (who are masters at this craft!) unless it creates an unpaintable area that will be visible. As a matter of fact, I find it easier to shove the brush into areas that may be slightly obscured and be OK with a minor paint job in those areas than the pain of painting the pieces separately and then assembling later. I use plastic glue for plastic, because I want the plastic to weld together. So, you do have to scrape any paint off of the glue area if you use plastic glue.
 
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