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Sir Proofreader
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4,251 Posts
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Hello everyone,

I was shown this article by my brother yesterday, and I thought it to be quite a good read. Somewhat funny but there's also some good advice in there for anyone struggling with writing, be it fluff for their army or one of those dreaded assignments that take away from out hobby time!

Anyway, you should hopefully be able to click on this writing and go to the article.

And I thought I'd pull this quote out, just in case you can't be bothered reading the article.

Doug Seacat said:
It doesn’t matter how much I write or how often I complete another tale: staring at a blank page never gets better. This is when all those vague summaries and things I glossed over in the outline become thorns to dig into my side and bleed away my creative enthusiasm. Fortunately that doesn’t last long. Things get better once I have a few paragraphs down. The main thing I try to remember is that those first difficult sentences don’t have to stay if I don’t like them later. They might exist only to build momentum so I can get on a good roll. I’ve had a number of stories where I’ve thrown out the entire first scene by the time I get through the revisions. Those first sentences still had to be written to get the story underway.
Just thought his advice might be of some use to someone. Enjoy! :dance:

Actually, if you do swing by the article... There are a lot more insider articles, which might have some useful advice for others. They talk to some of the sculptors, painters, photographers, and even preview a new Hordes faction in there (which may or may not be serious...)
 

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LO's Resident Time Lord
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3,270 Posts
*reads article*

As a writer, I can appreciate much of what's in there. As to the paragraph you quoted, truer words have never been spoken. Staring at a blank screen is terrifying. Putting something... ANYTHING... on that screen is better than looking at nothing. Sometimes, even a single sentence is enough to open the floodgates. Most creative writing starts with SOMETHING, be it the description of a character's clothes, a one-paragraph synopsis, or some hastily-scratched-out notes. Put it all on the screen. Often, the story takes off from there.
 
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