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Swarm Queen of LO
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Well, now I am about to embark on building a Red Corsairs army mighty enough to free humankind from the tyrannical grip of that bloated corpse some call the Emperor, but first they need to be painted.

I'm mostly familiar with Citadel paints and not very good at painting, so keep those things in mind. The one technique I've actually gotten decent enough at is dry-brushing and I also really like the way it looks, particularly on vehicles (which is important because my list is mechanized). I can also handle ink washes, but need to practice with them.

Basically, I'm going to go with a chaos black base, then do an ink wash of a rather dark color (maybe really dark brown just to add some texture/shading), then paint the shoulder pads and things like that scab red and drybrush over it with blood red. Most small details will be done in a mixture of bronze and gold. I will probably try to make the skin a range of colors (or races, if you prefer) - from pasty white to dark brown. Vehicles will follow the same basic scheme. And I will do some slight variations in color schemes to denote different squads.

I am going for a dull and earthy look while keeping the red and black of the Red Corsairs.

So, 3 questions -

1) How should I go about painting faces? I generally avoid models who aren't wearing helmets because I've always had trouble painting faces, but I'd like to change that - particularly when I get around to painting Huron.

2) My main problem with ink washes is they always look too much like the wash color and not enough like the base color. Is this because I'm not using enough water, or because I should be using detergent (liquid detergent, right?) or is that just how ink washes come out?

3) What do you think of the overall color scheme?
 

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LO Zealot
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1) How should I go about painting faces? I generally avoid models who aren't wearing helmets because I've always had trouble painting faces, but I'd like to change that - particularly when I get around to painting Huron.

2) My main problem with ink washes is they always look too much like the wash color and not enough like the base color. Is this because I'm not using enough water, or because I should be using detergent (liquid detergent, right?) or is that just how ink washes come out?

3) What do you think of the overall color scheme?
1) Since you are good with drybrushing you could do this: Paint Tanned Flesh and then drybrush Dwarf Flesh. Or you can practice in layer painting. First Tanned Flesh then Dwarf Flesh on the raised parts and then highlight with Elf Flesh!

2) What I have learned with ink washes is that a good detergent is nice for getting the ink in the crevices and the cracks and bringing detail look better. If you don't want to buy an expensive one then use the liquid for washing dishes! But in general inks tend to be rather darker than the colors...

3) It sounds like a solid and good color scheme. Of course it would help seeing some pictures! 8Y
 
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A bit of alright.
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As for the over all scheme: It sounds solid although I'm not a fan of golds. Personally I'ld go for a cohesive look on the armour, hilighting the red and black with a drybrush or two of basecoat+kommando khaki. Then make the details either strong or subdued depending on my mood when I did the first few...

Washes are almost always going to affect the colour underneath, thinning them really helps to reduce this, there should be some soap in your water regardless (it helps the brushes for one). I never use inks, prefering to use paints thinned to a very thin level. Thinned paint tints the surface of the model less than inks, flows into the recesses better and doesn't give that horrid "look at me I'm all inky" sheen.

When painting skin I start with a layer of vermin brown as a base and hilight with mixes of vermin brown kommando khaki, the trick is to make sure you go light enough. Then all you have to do is give the eyes and mouth a quick shade (scorched brown if you don't feel like more mixing) and put in the bottom lip, teeth (if any) and eyes. That's basically what I did on the marine in my avatar, to give an example of how it looks.

ONLY put in these details in you have a steady enough hand, it is easier to ruin a model by doing these wrong than by not doing them at all. It sounds like a lot of work for such a small area but it is the most important part of the model, take your time- it should be done in twenty minutes.

I hope that's a help, I can offer advice until the cows come home so if you want/need any more I will almost certainly get back to you in 24 hours or so.
 

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Swarm Queen of LO
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks for advice folks. I repped both of you. Particularly on the faces/skin tones - however, as you may have missed in my original post - not all my faces are going to be caucasian or light skinned. So how would I go about making dark skin?
 

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Red Corsais painting

Hi,

Well, now I am about to embark on building a Red Corsairs army mighty enough to free humankind from the tyrannical grip of that bloated corpse some call the Emperor, but first they need to be painted.
Good choice. :)

I've got 3 Vindicators left to paint, then my 3000pts of Red Corsairs are done. There was 1 White Dwarf that had an article about the new CSM's in it, and there was a page dedicated to painting Red Corsairs. I'll get the version number tonight when I get home.

There is also a link on the UK GW website for a Red Corsairs gallery.
GW Online : Warhammer 40,000 : Chaos Space Marines : Red Corsairs Army Gallery
I didn't do as much red as they did. I did shoulder pads inner section red, and then lower legs red. Boots black. Every 2nd or 3rd figure I did some different part of the backpack red.

My advice about the colour choices:
Black figures: you actually want to highlight them a bit. I sprayed all my figs black. Then took a very dark grey and dry brushed lightly over the figs. It brings out the edges nicely.

Doing the reds: I used Foundation Paints Mechrite Red for the base coat. You only need 1 coat to cover the black completely. I then did a diluted wash of red ink selectively into the creases. I then drybrushed blood red over the red.

Gold: I did burnished gold as inital colour. Then I did diluted flesh wash onto the gold. Then another light coat of gold. Then a VERY light dry brush of mithiral silver on the edges of the gold.

Skin tones: I cheat horribly. In South Africa, there is a company called Dala paints (art and craft type paints). They make a pink that is VERY pink. Like Baby-skin pink. I painted my faces with that straight on. Then a did flesh wash over this once dry. To get the different skin tones, sometime diluted wash, sometimes straight out, sometimes two coats of it. Varies the skin a lot, and it's quick. Tentacle pink is about the closest that GW paints have.

This ends up giving you a very good looking figure, for not a whole lot of work. You can go through them quickly, they still look good, but aren't all that complex to do.

For vechiles I did something similar. I chose a panel at random and painted that panel with the two reds. Then I did a light drybrush of dark grey over the rest to bring out the edges of it. I also wanted a bit more of a chaotic feel to it, so I copied some runes from one of the Chaos fantasy books and painted then in a really small brush on the doors of the vechiles in mechrite red. Makes it look way chaotic. I plan on buying a box of skeltons from Vampire Counts when they come out, to add details to my vechiles. Nothing like a skellie draped over a gun barrel to make your enemy think twice. :)

2) My main problem with ink washes is they always look too much like the wash color and not enough like the base color. Is this because I'm not using enough water, or because I should be using detergent (liquid detergent, right?) or is that just how ink washes come out?
I also used to have this problem. I've, over time, developed a mixture system I use that seems to work for washes. 10 drops water, 1 drop ink, 1 drop detergent. The detergent breaks the surface tension of water, allowing the ink to flow into the creases. One of the best lessons I learnt was to do selective inking. In the past I used to simply choose an uber brush and ink the whole figure. Now I tend to do smaller brush, inking only the sections I want inked.

Any other questions, give me a shout.

Evan Gotte
Cape Town, South Africa
 
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