Librarium Online Forums banner
1 - 10 of 10 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
149 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I was wondering if anyone has any experience in spray priming in cold weather. And by cold weather, I mean about -4 deg Celcius.

I can mount my miniatures and be ready inside before I go out to spray for about 2-3 minutes.

I have tried spraying indoors, but I can't seem to avoid the black "dust".
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
It sucks but I would'nt if I was you. The models will come out all rough like its got sand or dust on it, and I know about spraying indoors, that was a really bad idea.

You could try bluetacking the model to something long like a piece of wood (I used balsawood) then holding it out a window and then spay, a bit at a time, then bringing it in to let it dry. Iv tryed that and it works, just a bit of a pain to do.

Hope that helps and good luck.....stu.....
 

·
Chilli Fueled Heretic
Joined
·
5,839 Posts
I was wondering if anyone has any experience in spray priming in cold weather. And by cold weather, I mean about -4 deg Celcius.

I can mount my miniatures and be ready inside before I go out to spray for about 2-3 minutes.

I have tried spraying indoors, but I can't seem to avoid the black "dust".
Many people have problems spraying in cold weather. It makes the paint 'bobble', which is not good. The best way to avoid this is to bring models inside fast after spraying or you could try drying them with some heat applied, a hairdryer or electric heat might work but could have some strange effects. Id try it out on a piece of skrap first before your prize model.

If you bring the models inside, watch out for the smell, it lingers and is not nice indoors really.

Dan
 

·
running
Joined
·
1,274 Posts
I live in Boston and while it isn't -4 Celsius very often we do have some pretty chilly winters. Last winter I would wait for a sunny weekend day and do tons of priming at once. I have have 40+ models built, cleaned, and based sitting on my shelf at all times and when a nice day came along I would prime the whole lot. I'd take about 5 out a time, prime them, and bring them back inside as quickly as I could. It isn't optimal but over the course of the winter I managed to find two or three good days.
 

·
Member
Joined
·
128 Posts
Living up north in Canada where we live in igloos it's hard to find warm weather in the winter. OK kidding about the igloo part, but it's been -30 celcius outside for the last month, and my spray priming still needed to be done. I get everything ready, open the door spray everything, and then come back inside as fast as I can and let them dry in the apartment hallway.

This avoids the smell, and doesn't get you evicted by spraying in the hallway. It's not optimal, but I've avoided any problems with my minis. I don't spray the entire model at once though, just one side at a time for a bunch of models. So the models are outside for about 30 seconds, and require 3-4 outings to finish (sides/top).

No problems yet (but definately don't leave them outside or it will rot/eat your models and gob and all sorts of bad things.
 

·
Junior Member
Joined
·
419 Posts
I had the same problem and asked the same question earlier in the year. I got the same kind of answers but I ended up waiting for a nicer day outside(no snow is considered a nicer day) and did it then. I prep'd the models onto my cardboard box and spray paint inside, and went outside and did it all at once, doing a fairly quick job. Once done priming i brought the models back inside and let them dry. It worked fairly well for me, considering i live in an appartment building and did it on my balcony. Otherwise, find a garage or something and do the same thing. Do it fairly quick, out and in.

(that's what she said)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
149 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thanks for all the good replies.

The situation was this: I had no other models ready for painting so I mounted four minatures on my Mauly rack. This is a rack where I can hold the rack in my hand while spraying. I can then spray from all angles pretty quick.

I went outside, sprayed and went inside. All in less than two minutes and the paint was wet when I got in. I left it to dry in a cool (not cold) room. And as far as I can tell, they came out pretty okay.

If i find problems with these models later on, I have learned something. If it came out okay, I can do it again later this winter.

They are a small part of my new (and first) army, so there is no great loss. I will batch paint them and that, to me, means I will take some shortcuts and will not paint my very best. (the best I can at that speed of course, but...)
 

·
Aliens ate my soul.
Joined
·
1,413 Posts
I sprayed some models (with G.W black undercoat spray) last night and it was really cold -6 celsius were i was (in the u.k)
i let the models dry outside and to be honest i can't really tell the difference. There is a slight bobbling effect but it's not noticeable and will be covered in paint anyway. The only draw back is the paint did take a while longer to dry.
But i did also try my G.W spray gun as well, maybe it was the cold but i could'nt get it to work at all, i will try it again when it warms up and see if that helps.

- Boomer.
 

·
Cthulhu's Lovechild
Joined
·
1,746 Posts
I'd invest in a brushable primer.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,490 Posts
Boomer, the spray propellant doesn't work as well at low temperatures due to the fact it uses pressure to expell the paint from the can, and pressure depends on temp. I assume when you've sprayed before you've noticed the can gets cold quickly, and after a short period of time when it is very cold it just doesn't spray properly. Well, with cold weather it is like someone's already been spraying for a few mins as the can is colder than it would be in the summer, so you get very little useful time for spraying.
 
1 - 10 of 10 Posts
Top