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What happens when you paint something white, say a enhanced senses carni head, and then inkink it black? Does the white go all away or is there still some left?
Thanks in Advance
-Doom
 

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Ender of Threads
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Never tried it, personally. However, the wash should leave most of the black in the recesses, and maybe a bit over the raised bits, too. The white won't be gone, per se, but chances are that it'll wind up as a bit of a dirty looking grey.
 

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Actually, a standard technique for painting skellies is to white undercoat them, then wash them with black ink and wipe off the top layer, leaving ink in the recesses. Looks damned good too.
 

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Another method of a dirty grey is to drybrush some black or grey over the white. That makes it look kinda dusty, though. Using ink makes it patchy and wet.
 

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Too Sexy For My Whirlwind
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Drybrushing is becoming an ancient tactic for painting i'm thinking. More and more are people using other modes of painting to get the job done i'm afraid.
 

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Art Culinaire
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Dont forget to water down your paints, especially if you plan on using black ink.

I've found over time that straight black ink can damage some of the upper raised
areas. water your ink down just a tiny bit and you'll like the results.

Also you might want to try brown ink over white, or maybe chestnut ink.
 

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Sabe said:
Drybrushing is becoming an ancient tactic for painting i'm thinking. More and more are people using other modes of painting to get the job done i'm afraid.
It's old, but so are most of the other things people use for minis. Drybrushing is a great beginner's tactic because it's pretty easy, and it's also useful even once you have more experience for some jobs (i.e, some highly textured areas can be done mostly with drybrushing and inks, then touched up afterwards for the brightest highlights).
 

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The Fallen
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Sithlet said:
It's old, but so are most of the other things people use for minis. Drybrushing is a great beginner's tactic because it's pretty easy, and it's also useful even once you have more experience for some jobs (i.e, some highly textured areas can be done mostly with drybrushing and inks, then touched up afterwards for the brightest highlights).
I think he is talking from personnal experiance, drybrushing is usually the first real attempt at shadding that people make, most eventually graduate to dry blending and precious few finall master wet blending, dry brushing will remain in the tool set for most people for ever IMHO and interestingly enough is used by pros but they do it properly (most people use too much paint)

mixing paint or ink with alcohol is commonly used for airbrushing, I ran out of isopropyl alcohol #(rubbing alcohol) over the wekend so went to get some more- most chemists in the uk have stopepd selling it so I had to switch to windscreen de-icer, this coupled with flow enhancer worked, although ideally you should use acrylic base, Tamaya(sp) make one quite cheaply
 
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