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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Ok I've searched and everything I've seen is 100 different people saying they use this, but nothing of which is the best or most cost efficient.

As far as GW's green stuff, plastic glue, PVA glue, and superglue, what are better replacements and do you have links/ where to buy cheapest. I'll support my store in models, but the tools are a ripoff and I hear there are better alternatives. GW outsources anyways so they dont make as much as they do models I'm guessing
 

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My backpack has JETS!
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I use GW Citadel paints because I think they're quite good. Especially the foundation paints and washes. However, Vallejo do some fantastic paints in almost the same colour ranges.

Oh, wait, you meant glues. Well I got my PVA glue from a hardware store. £2 for five litres. Same goes for sand, any hardware or garden store will sell various sizes of grit and sand very cheaply. For plastic glue I like Revell Contacta, because it allows for very small precise applications. For superglue, I use GW's own because I like the little brush, even though it is a little overpriced. I get my green stuff and glues and any other hobby tools (sculpting tools, etc) from online hobby retailers, www.barrule.com and www.giftsforgeeks.org are two of my favourites.

 

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As I was a military model builder before 40k, I still prefer the Testors/Model Master series of glue and paints. The model glue is around $4 USD for a tube that will last me several years. It doesn't create a bond like super glue, but rather melts the plastic together (as long as there is no paint on the contact surfaces) making it near impossible to separate.

I use gel super/krazy glue for metals. I prefer the gel as I believe it sets a little faster (at least enough for me to stop holding it).

The Model Master paints are petroleum based (need a special brush cleaner, not water) but as such are very thin and won't obscure small details. They are also generally all the same finish (matte) and blend very well. GW black tends to be somewhat shiny and very thick.

I agree that the GW hobby tools are ridiculously overpriced ($15US for spray paint!!)
I saw a GW hobby knife to $12US, my local hobby store had the same size with blades for $4.
Also, you can get much better brushes at a hobby shop or art supply store for much much cheaper than the GW (better quality too).

Anyway, my 2cents (and then some)
-John
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Yeah I've heard there are better brushes but havent seen any nice all in one sets like GW. I was thinking of simply buying the GW brush set, then later after I've learned everything I could expand into better products. TOols I've gotten (micromark.com) But glue I'm still not settled. Bonding and melting plastic sounds scary man!
 

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Most plastic model glue works this way. Certainly preferable if you don't really intend on dissassembling your figures/models. Also keeps them from coming apart when dropped.
 

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Consumate professional
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I use GW plastic glue- I don't find it particularly expensive and its good at what it does. GWs superglue though....i've never got on with it, I use loctite (because its cheap in my local DIY shop) and occaionally Araldite resin for trickier bonding. Army Painter have a super glue that looks interesting as it has an applicator specifically designed to use on miniatures, also the rest of thier products (tools, dips etc) are of a high quality so I may try it out at some point.

For paints I use a mixture of GW and vallejo, brushes I use Windsor and Newton, tools I use Army painter/Gale Force Nine.
 

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LO's Resident Time Lord
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Not sure where the OP is from, so apologies if this stuff isn't available.

For cutting, I use an X-Acto hobby knife and blades. I'll probably be buried with the things, I use them so much. I also have an X-Acto model saw, but I'm not sure this is the best you can buy. All of this you can find at your local big-box department store (such as Wal-Mart), or arts and crafts stores like Michael's or A. C. Moore.

For glue, I've used Zap-A-Gap before for plastic/plastic, eventually gave it up since it didn't work on metal too well for me, and I'd rather use something that works on all materials. I've used Krazy Glue in the past with great results, and lately I've been hooked on Loctite glue. All of these work. For PVA glue, I use good old-fashioned Elmer's, but pretty much any white glue will work. Heck, even the grocery stores where I live sell the stuff. Wherever you find art stuff for kids, you can find white glue (construction paper, poster paints, etc.). Often, the superglues I mentioned aren't far away from where you'll find the PVA stuff.

For brushes, the GW sets aren't half bad, actually. Good value for the money. You can get LOTS of different types of brushes at Michael's/A. C. Moore or other art supply stores. Prices and quality vary, but by and large you should avoid synthetic bristles, as they tend to "stretch" as you work with them, which makes the tip bend permanently. Maddeining, that. By far, the brush "gold standard" is the Winsor & Newton Series 7. They are not cheap, but they are invaluable, especially when it's time to do fine detail work like eyeballs. I got mine here (Clicky!). You'll save a ton. I have one size 0, and one size 1. That, and a few other brushes for the basic, slather-it-on basecoating, a few others for drybrushing, and a couple large ones for tanks. Outside of the W&Ns, they are various brands and qualities. The synthetics, though, if I still have them, are my drybrushes, and that's about all they're good for.

Something else to consider: brush soap. You can get a cake of the stuff. Then, once you THINK your brush is clean, especially at the end of a painting session, get it wet and "paint" the cake, and watch all the paint come out! Great stuff, that. Again, check the art stores.

Kneadtite is indeed a good substitute for green stuff. In fact, I'm told it's actually the EXACT same stuff, but it's sold through GW (at a much higher price) under the "Green Stuff" brand. You can get ribbons of this stuff, enough to last the average modeler for years, for under $10 US on EBay.

Lastly, really quick, for paints, I use GW and Vallejo (mostly Vallejo) for "regular" colors, GW washes for washing, GW foundation paints for basecoating, and GW metallics.

Look for more help in the painting and modeling sub-forums here.

Good luck!


EDIT: Changed the thread title for you. :)
 

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X-Acto knife/blades, Saw, pin vise

Atlus brushes from the local store, a Reaper Kolinsky 10/0, some cheap brushes from the art section at the supermarket

Bought 2 tubes of kneadatite like 6 months ago for 15-10 bucks, i'll be good for a long long time

Mainly GW paints because my local store sells them (it's about all they sell that isn't for RC airplanes) but, I do like reaper paints except they're sometimes really hard to squeeze some out of the bottles

I also use reaper flow improver and drying retarder.
 

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The other Kind of Fluff
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A few basic tools & supplies I use:

REALISTIC WATER: for the creation of ponds & streams








WATER EFFECTS: for the creation of rapids & white water




APOXIE SCULPT: cheaper alternative to green stuff


CLAMP TWEEZERS (straight & bent): for holding models



FORCEPS: for holding models


DENTAL TOOLS: for sculpting green stuff (excellent purchase)


CENTRIFUGES (15 ml & 50 ml): for holding custom paint mixes



TRANSFER PIPETTE: for adding water to paints & transferring custom mixes to centrifuges


PETRI DISH: for wet palettes (insert sponge soaked in water into petri dish, then place wax paper over sponge. Dab paints directly on top of wax paper).


RUBBER GRAPES: for use in the creation of pustules (note: the 'ooze' is actually Water Effects mixed with a very small amount of Goblin Green paint)


 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
thanks guys I really appreciate the help. I've heard Winsor & Newton are the best, but I'll get them when I've become an experienced painter and destroy my GW brushes.
I've also picked up some Testors spray varnish and all my tools. Evertyhing is set (just need a little water dropper for mixing paint and brush soap)

what is the best way for mixing paints
 

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The other Kind of Fluff
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I use an older brush that has since been downgraded to a "dry brush" for mixing purposes, starting with the base colors and then adding other paints as needed. Water is usually dropped into the mix once the paint ratios are about right. All of this takes place on a wet palette. I strongly recommend you make one for yourself. It's incredibly easy. It's the only way I paint anymore. You'll find your paints remain moist without the continual need of adding additional drops of water. Here's a wet palette made from basic household supplies: plastic ink cartridge container, foam from an Army Transport tray, wax paper.



For those interested, here are some related sites:

Centrifuges & Pipettes:
Perfector Scientific Disposable Plasticware for Laboratories

Tools:
eBay Store - dremel: fiskars, x-acto, jeweler (ebay site)
 

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LO's Resident Time Lord
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I use a toothpick to transfer from GW pots (Vallejo have dropper tips), and to mix with.
 

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@Canew

That brush soap sounds great, i'll be getting myself some of that next time i'm near an art shop. Thanks
 

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i use Gale Force Nine stuff as it is a little cheaper than GW. Especially for basing my models (like sand and grass and stuff). I mainly get it cause my local shop sells it
 
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